Thread: Practises for cessation of what has come to be?

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    Forums Member Element's Avatar
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    Practises for cessation of what has come to be?

    A discussion topic.

    Iti 49 says:

    How, bhikkhus, do those with vision see? Herein a bhikkhu sees what has come to be as having come to be. Having seen it thus, he practises the course for turning away, for dispassion, for the cessation of what has come to be. Thus, bhikkhus, do those with vision see.

    Iti 49
    How do we think or explain how the above practised?

    Please discuss

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    Forums Member mjaviem's Avatar
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    Easy . They first see passion arising so they seek the quenching of it.

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    Forums Member Esho's Avatar
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    Mindfulness... being mindfull of what arises... and then vanishes... impermanence.


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    One of the most difficult practices, seemingly easy but not so when you try to incorporate it into meaningful meditation practice. Like a lot of these suttas they are meaningless without some sort of guide you can follow. There plenty to choose from. The ones I tend to use are either from insight or mindfulness programmes of meditation, or a combination of the two. One I like to follow is based on the Satipatthana Sutta, starting with considering the body and then moving on to other stuff. Not easy, as you will see if you follow this link: https://tricycle.org/trikedaily/sati...a-mindfulness/

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    Forums Member mjaviem's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Esho View Post
    Mindfulness... being mindfull of what arises... and then vanishes... impermanence.

    I'm not sure. We can be mindful enough to notice for example the roar of a thunder. It arises and vanishes, it doesn't last, though I don't think that is what we should be mindful of. I think we should be mindful of any greed or hatred arising. I think things "come to be" or "become" when there is attachment and attachment happens when there is desire. So we must watch for any desire arising and practise towards cessation of desire. I don't know, this is my understanding so far, from reading suttas, hearing dhamma talks and hearing/reading to the OP explain these things in the past. But I might have gotten all wrong, of course.

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    Forums Member mjaviem's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Element View Post
    A discussion topic.

    Iti 49 says:
    ...
    That "turning away" looks similar to end up being mindful of the breathing. I don't know. Just saying

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    I was reading this month's 'Philosophy Now' magazine which, being February, is about how differents philosophers have dealt with the concept of love. What caught my eye was the philosopher Husserl's approach which, "...requires us to be aware of our preconceptions about love and then 'bracket' them off, in order to become a stranger in its strange land and observe our experience of it as objectively as possible." The 'stranger' bit is from Heinlein's 'Stranger in a Strange Land' where the hero is a stranger on Earth and looks at things as an outsider.

    It struck me that 'bracketing off' things to look at them more objectively is more or less what you do when you practice for 'the cessation of what has come to be'. One way of using insight or mindfulness meditation is to do just that, bracket them off as they arise and look at them dispassionately as an outsider. Easier said than done, of course, but it is one way 'in' to the practice.

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    In another article on empathy and compassion is the idea that we can place things in a wheelbarrow without displacing their importance (weight) but allowing us to move on. Another way to say 'bracketing off'. Such images may be useful in our meditation visualisation practice for cessation.

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    I think it means what it says "A Bhikku sees what has come to be as having come to be" I take this to be a cognitive understanding of how their mind is
    "Having seen it thus, he practices the course for turning away," Having seen that the mind has a defilement leading to stress (Dukkha) recognising the defilement leading to stress he deliberately counters the problem with a skilful means leading to "dispassion, for the cessation of what has come to be"
    "Thus, Bhikkhus, do those with vision see" or as I would put it, wisdom arises.

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