Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Thread: Exploring Buddhism later in life.

  1. #11
    Another resource which I enjoyed reading myself, is this transcript of a talk given by Ajahn Amaro, who's the abbot of Amaravati Monastery UK....

    "Theravada Buddhism in a Nutshell"

    https://www.abhayagiri.org/media/boo...a_nutshell.pdf



  2. #12
    Forums Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    498
    Quote Originally Posted by Fenchurch View Post
    For those of you who discovered Buddhism at a later stage of their lives may I ask how easy was/is it for you to learn about?

    The reason why I'm asking is because I find the depth and complexity a bit daunting sometimes. I was raised a Christian and my family would always go to church on Sundays and place great importance on the principles and reverance of that faith Christmas etc, so when I began to be intrigued with Buddhism a few years ago and began researching it throughly after a lifetime of being raised on the Christian faith I have found trying to assimate this new faith with the current one I was raised with quite challenging at times.
    Hi Fenchurch, I have known many people of advancing years get into and thrive in Buddhism, there has been a great deal of good advice in this thread, especially the advice to look at "early Buddhism" which is a euphemism for looking at what the Buddha actually said.

    This is important for various reasons, but in my experience the most important reason is the unique approach of the Buddha to the human condition, I note that you have a grounding in Christianity, and point out that your family would always go to church on Sundays and place great importance on the principles and reverence of that faith.

    For me, this is a key insight into the difficulty many people experience when exploring Buddhism for the first time, it is not age-related but related to the difficulty all of us have in looking at spirituality when you come from a metaphysical standpoint and meet the Buddha's teachings which are not metaphysical but pragmatic.

    We tend to look at Buddhism as we would look at a faith-based system of ideas, principles and creeds that have to be understood and accepted as truth, have faith in as it were.

    Buddhism isn't that, in many respects, it is the opposite of that, the Buddha asked his followers to adopt a scientific principle of investigation and sceptical investigation because Buddhism is not about belief but an experiential understanding of reality.

    Buddhism, at least early Buddhism, is asking you to experiment with ethical behaviour, meditation practices and the wisdom that arises from the open and honest understanding that arises from that experimentation, the wisdom you personally gain.

    Looking for the truth in Buddhism is not found solely in books or in teachers, much of the understandings which many people find confusing or baffling are confusing and baffling because a person who has not understood the reality behind the concepts have no proper reference points in their experience to understand them.

    The practice of Buddhism is a path, it is a path because as you travel down it you gain wisdom, understanding, and that honest discernment is what Buddhism is all about, your own knowledge shared with others on the same path, it is not a faith or belief, the saying goes that the Buddha just points the way.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by McKmike View Post

    .....The practice of Buddhism is a path, it is a path because as you travel down it you gain wisdom, understanding, and that honest discernment is what Buddhism is all about, your own knowledge shared with others on the same path, it is not a faith or belief, the saying goes that the Buddha just points the way.

    Good to see you posting again, Mike!



  4. #14
    Forums Member Fenchurch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2021
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    39
    Quote Originally Posted by Aloka View Post
    Another resource which I enjoyed reading myself, is this transcript of a talk given by Ajahn Amaro, who's the abbot of Amaravati Monastery UK....

    "Theravada Buddhism in a Nutshell"

    https://www.abhayagiri.org/media/boo...a_nutshell.pdf


    Thank you for that, that was very helpful and the kind of thing I'm looking for. I feel that I'm now coming towards the end of the 'research phase' and I'm begining to focus more now on 'practice' because of articles like that.

  5. #15
    Forums Member Genecanuck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    258
    Hello friends,
    I was interested in this thread because I also have come to Buddhist ideas and concepts late in life.

    I have saved all the references and plan to carefully read them this week.

    Kind Regards,

    Gene

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Genecanuck View Post
    Hello friends,
    I was interested in this thread because I also have come to Buddhist ideas and concepts late in life.

    I have saved all the references and plan to carefully read them this week.

    Kind Regards,

    Gene
    Hi Gene

    Hope you enjoy your reading!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Los Angeles Mexico City London Colombo Kuala Lumpur Sydney
Thu, 10:56 PM Fri, 12:56 AM Fri, 6:56 AM Fri, 12:26 PM Fri, 2:56 PM Fri, 5:56 PM