Thread: Fear of the void

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    Forums Member BlueFaky's Avatar
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    Fear of the void

    Hello dear friends.

    Have you ever seen a scary 'void' in your meditations ?

    Like there is nothing to let go anymore ? Like even the 'let go of emptyness' sentence no longer makes sense ?

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    Global Moderator Esho's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueFaky View Post
    Hello dear friends.

    Have you ever seen a scary 'void' in your meditations ?

    Like there is nothing to let go anymore ? Like even the 'let go of emptyness' sentence no longer makes sense ?
    Emptyness during meditation is part of a samadhi state. Its experienced as something beautiful and peaceful. It happens when the mind becomes at ease and fabrications become so slower that there are spaces of emptyness and when the self vanishes slowly.

    I don't know what kind of meditation you practice Blue Faky but with Zazen this is the standard experience after a long long time of practice; in my case it is a wonderful experience when experienced.


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    Hi BlueFaky. The 'leap of faith' into the void comes next. Sometimes the brain rebels against such things, like when you go abseiling for the first time. I was taught at the Buddhist centre that it was like climbing a ladder, reaching the top rung and then having to take the next step up with no safety net. As Esho says, the next bit is fun if you go for it.

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    Forums Member BlueFaky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Esho View Post
    I don't know what kind of meditation you practice Blue Faky
    I don't know either. This 'void' showed up in my meditation after a bad loss in my life https://www.buddhismwithoutboundarie...ur-enlightment it's the only thing I can say since I do not go to Buddhist monasteries anymore so I can't pinpoint which school I belong to Sorry for that lack of of terms I know it doesn't help the board much.

    Quote Originally Posted by Esho View Post
    Emptyness during meditation is part of a samadhi state
    The thing is I don't really know if this is emptyness. In my understanding, emptyness is still a little bit linked with the remains of the dying self but what I saw is actually the feeling that death is the only free will in this life. Sorry I know it's shocking but this is what I felt.

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    Forums Member BlueFaky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by philg View Post
    Hi BlueFaky. The 'leap of faith' into the void comes next. Sometimes the brain rebels against such things, like when you go abseiling for the first time. I was taught at the Buddhist centre that it was like climbing a ladder, reaching the top rung and then having to take the next step up with no safety net. As Esho says, the next bit is fun if you go for it.
    Ok thanks. So what you're saying is the deconstructing of yourself when meditating is disturbing to the point it is normal to not even know who you are anymore ? Can the 'leap of faith' happen in such a condition ?

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    Hi BlueFaky,

    Its possible that you might find this little meditation book helpful, "Finding the Missing Peace" by Ajahn Amaro (Abbot of Amaravati Monastery UK):

    https://www.amaravati.org/dhamma-boo...st-meditation/

    Excerpt from the Preface to the book:


    One of the main principles of Buddhism is that no teachings that are given are necessarily to be believed in or taken on as true out of hand. The encouragement the Buddha always gave was to investigate the teachings and then use them and see if they work for oneself. If they do work, if they bring benefit, then continue to apply them. If they don’t work, or they don’t have meaning, or one finds them to be wrong, then just put them aside and leave them.

    ....and also you might enjoy this 10 minute video with Ajahn Amaro: "Learning to Live Happily with the Present":




    With metta,

    Aloka

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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueFaky View Post
    Ok thanks. So what you're saying is the deconstructing of yourself when meditating is disturbing to the point it is normal to not even know who you are anymore ? Can the 'leap of faith' happen in such a condition ?
    It is an interesting question. I don't think deconstructing yourself is how I'd describe the meditation processes I went through unless you are talking about the need to come to terms with the idea that you are not immortal, but in fact will die some day. Many traditional meditations are designed for this, such as meditating where bodies are being cremated (in India) but these practices are specialist things which should be done with a trusted teacher, if at all. My experience was to link my knowledge of the human body (I was trained to be a biology teacher initially) with traditional meditations about the body, the working bits and stuff you'd not normally be comfortable dwelling on. This was back when I was working through the Satipatthana Sutta, which includes a series of meditations starting with the body and moving on to question everything.

    The idea is to help you let go of everything holding you back, including the idea of nothing. If you have let go of who you are then to the extent of not knowing who you are any more, then you have to let go of this not knowing who you are too. Letting go is not pushing anything away but loosening attachments to things, including your idea of what you are. In which case you aren't quite the you you were before, but you are still 'you'. Coming to terms with yourself during any transition is hard, but especially so if you are doing it without a teacher.

    If this is difficult then the idea of a leap of faith is even more so, and I wouldn't have even considered such a thing if it wasn't part of a series of practices taught at the Buddhist centre I went to, with plenty of people around to offer advice.

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    Forums Member BlueFaky's Avatar
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    Hey thanks Aloka !
    That's great.
    I love the Ajahn Amaro advice in the video 'your body is always in the present'. Simple and efficient !


    Quote Originally Posted by Aloka View Post
    Hi BlueFaky,

    Its possible that you might find this little meditation book helpful, "Finding the Missing Peace" by Ajahn Amaro (Abbot of Amaravati Monastery UK):

    https://www.amaravati.org/dhamma-boo...st-meditation/

    Excerpt from the Preface to the book:



    ....and also you might enjoy this 10 minute video with Ajahn Amaro: "Learning to Live Happily with the Present":




    With metta,

    Aloka

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    Forums Member BlueFaky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by philg View Post
    It is an interesting question. I don't think deconstructing yourself is how I'd describe the meditation processes I went through unless you are talking about the need to come to terms with the idea that you are not immortal, but in fact will die some day. Many traditional meditations are designed for this, such as meditating where bodies are being cremated (in India) but these practices are specialist things which should be done with a trusted teacher, if at all. My experience was to link my knowledge of the human body (I was trained to be a biology teacher initially) with traditional meditations about the body, the working bits and stuff you'd not normally be comfortable dwelling on. This was back when I was working through the Satipatthana Sutta, which includes a series of meditations starting with the body and moving on to question everything.

    The idea is to help you let go of everything holding you back, including the idea of nothing. If you have let go of who you are then to the extent of not knowing who you are any more, then you have to let go of this not knowing who you are too. Letting go is not pushing anything away but loosening attachments to things, including your idea of what you are. In which case you aren't quite the you you were before, but you are still 'you'. Coming to terms with yourself during any transition is hard, but especially so if you are doing it without a teacher.

    If this is difficult then the idea of a leap of faith is even more so, and I wouldn't have even considered such a thing if it wasn't part of a series of practices taught at the Buddhist centre I went to, with plenty of people around to offer advice.
    Thank you so much Phil that's a great answer

    I guess you're right, I should not be practicing alone, I don't know why I'm doing so. I guess I could never trust someone enough to the Buddhist place I used to go because I was afraid to being told 'start by beginners exercices' ! Don't try to go too fast !' Maybe these people are right, maybe in ten years I'll say I wasted my time and I have being deluding myself. Ho well...

    Back to the problem when I said 'I don't know who I am anymore when I see the void', it is doing better now because I have found that everybody carries his past in his flesh. Your body always reminds you of the narrow perceptions you had when glued in the self. I find that my body is like an open book to the past I can read or ignore. So I can keep going and let go of this not knowing who I am, because my flesh will always reming me just in case.

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