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Thread: About the "self"

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    [This post was moved from the Theravada forum (https://www.buddhismwithoutboundarie...quot-self-quot) as it is not relevant to Theravada Buddhism. -Woodscooter]


    For those interested in a scientific take on self, this abstract 'Self Illusion: How the social brain creates identity' by Bruce Hood points to contemporary thought about self https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2012-12731-000. My interest is that it is possible to change how we think about the self and our identity as an individual, and that Buddhism offers a unique way to do this for outcomes we would like to develop. Science helps by showing the fluidity or otherwise of the whole thing.

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    Forums Member Genecanuck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by philg View Post

    For those interested in a scientific take on self, this abstract 'Self Illusion: How the social brain creates identity' by Bruce Hood points to contemporary thought about self https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2012-12731-000. My interest is that it is possible to change how we think about the self and our identity as an individual, and that Buddhism offers a unique way to do this for outcomes we would like to develop. Science helps by showing the fluidity or otherwise of the whole thing.
    Thanks for sharing this Philg,

    My reflection is that this highlights the fact that reality is a social construct. I also see how this is consistant with a Buddhist world view. However, I say this with humility because I am am not an expert in Buddhism.

    Kind Regards,

    Gene

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    Forums Member Olderon's Avatar
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    Thanks, philg.

    Where buddhism has it right is "self" is defined as a process consisting of mind and body, ever changing.

    SCIENCE as yet has no agreed upon definition, except in the psychiatric sence.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Olderon View Post
    Thanks, philg.

    Where buddhism has it right is "self" is defined as a process consisting of mind and body, ever changing.

    SCIENCE as yet has no agreed upon definition, except in the psychiatric sence.
    Hi Olderon. I don't think that science has all the answers to the human condition, which is why we have a spiritual aspect to explore with. Of course this applies to the arts and other ways of investigating the world too. I think problems arise when people claim science as an authority on something when science itself would agree that it isn't. I'm interested in scientific investigations into self just as I am into investigating my own self through meditation and following the path.

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    Forums Member Olderon's Avatar
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    philg: ..."problems arise when people claim science as an authority on something when science itself would agree that it isn't."
    Indeed! Science has a built in system that when they are found experimentally to be wrong, or even when a more or equally plausible theory comes along, which seems to fit better or equally for some reason, that those ideas, proven experimentally or not, are considered and argued in the various fields of research and theoretical development. Physics and Chemistry are excellent examples of such fields, and Dark Matter and Dark Energy are excellent current specific examples.

    Popularity and even gender seems to fit into the equation of scientific acceptance as well. We see this phenomenon also with Buddhist teachings and with many religious teachings, too. The common factor seems to be cultural norms within each group.

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