Share on Facebook

Thread: Animal-hybrid Experimentation

  1. #1
    Any thoughts in connection with this article?

    Does Animal-hybrid Experimentation Alleviate Suffering?

    https://www.buddhistdoor.net/feature...iate-suffering

    .

  2. #2
    Forums Member justusryans's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Topping, Virginia
    Posts
    264
    I don’t think it alleviates suffering, I think it just causes more sadness to everyone. Where does it end? When we have experimentation and flawed thinking then this needs to be addressed by everyone at the most basic level.
    While I don’t have a PhD, I know right from wrong. This is wrong.

  3. #3
    Technical Administrator woodscooter's Avatar
    Location
    London UK
    Posts
    1,577
    Right on, justusryans. I couldn't agree more.

  4. #4
    Forums Member Olderon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Concord, New Hampshire, U.S.A.
    Posts
    266
    Since the main objection to this experimental process is "ethics", whose and what ethical principles are we going to adopt here?

    Since this is a Buddhist forum, and the author is a Buddhist my assumption is that the ethical principles to which we are held are "The Precepts", the most important of which is The First: "Cause no harm to sentient beings."

    If medical science develops a "non-sentient" being in which to grow replacement organs to be used for medical repairs, then in fact "no harm" is caused to sentient beings.

    However, some precepts are translated: "Cause no harm to "living" beings".

    C. Avihinsa-sankappa: resolving not to think in ways that aim at punishing or doing violence to others, or in ways that would lead to harm for other people or living beings. No matter how good or evil other people may be, we don't give rein to thoughts of envy, jealousy or competitiveness. We can shed these things from the heart because they are harmful to us — and when we can do ourselves harm, there is nothing to keep us from harming others.
    source: https://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/...thtopeace.html

    To which translation we are held is a matter of personal practice chosen.

    Precepts are not commandments. They are modes of principles by which we have personally chosen to live, and therefore will act as our personal guide once we have committed to them.

    As to the question posed by the author: Much suffering has been caused by medical science applied in accordance with the morals of the practicing scientist. However, if they are given the same respect of their moral foundations and reasoning as are Buddhists. If so, we have no right to criticize the moral foundations of others, except to make certain we live by our own personal ethical standards by which we have committed to live. Otherwise, we should mind our own business, IMHO, unless their behaviors have an effect upon ours.

    source: https://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/.../precepts.html

    Example: GMO's (genetically modified organisms) increase crop productivity for humans, but some of the plant byproducts have been shown to affect butterflies, event to the result of causing death during the growth cycle. Therefore, a Buddhist who has committed to The First Precept should consider the harm caused by the seed, which he plants.

    This is no simple biological consideration, because many plants have developed biochemical protections against predation. The Acacia is a recent example, where a region in Africa found that herds were dying due to over-foraging on local Acacias, which activated their protective chemical exudations to protect themselves from being killed by the foraging animals.

    From a karmic perspective, since intention matters, and the scientist's intention is to save lives by growing human organs, then from the perspective of medical science, this action / pursuit is well intended, unless considered purely from the Buddhist perspective.

    So, instead of promoting resigned powerlessness, the early Buddhist notion of karma focused on the liberating potential of what the mind is doing with every moment. Who you are — what you come from — is not anywhere near as important as the mind's motives for what it is doing right now. Even though the past may account for many of the inequalities we see in life, our measure as human beings is not the hand we've been dealt, for that hand can change at any moment. We take our own measure by how well we play the hand we've got. If you're suffering, you try not to continue the unskillful mental habits that would keep that particular karmic feedback going. If you see that other people are suffering, and you're in a position to help, you focus not on their karmic past but your karmic opportunity in the present: Someday you may find yourself in the same predicament that they're in now, so here's your opportunity to act in the way you'd like them to act toward you when that day comes.
    source: https://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/...aro/karma.html

    Suppose the scientist is a Jew, a Christian, or Moslem? What religious moral perspective is correct in this case, since everyone has "good" and "beneficial" intentions, which is the primary effector of karmic consequences?

    Ron _/\_
    Last edited by Olderon; 27 Aug 19 at 11:50.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Olderon
    Since the main objection to this experimental process is "ethics", whose and what ethical principles are we going to adopt here?

    Since this is a Buddhist forum, and the author is a Buddhist my assumption is that the ethical principles to which we are held are "The Precepts", the most important of which is The First: "Cause no harm to sentient beings."

    its worth noting that the author writes the following paragraph together with part of Sn 1.8 (Karaniya Metta Sutta - The Buddha's Words on Loving Kindness)


    From a Buddhist point of view, however, this is missing a much larger issue: the ethics of engaging in such experiments in the first place. Even without human-like traits or organs, animals are worthy of our concern, as famously noted in the Discourse on Loving-Kindness:

    Whatever living beings there may be;
    Whether they are weak or strong, omitting none,
    The great or the mighty, medium, short or small,
    The seen and the unseen,
    Those living near and far away,
    Those born and to-be-born—
    May all beings be at ease!



    Link to the complete Karaniya Metta Sutta:

    https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipi...1.08.amar.html



Los Angeles Mexico City London Colombo Kuala Lumpur Sydney
Sun, 3:17 PM Sun, 5:17 PM Sun, 11:17 PM Mon, 3:47 AM Mon, 6:17 AM Mon, 8:17 AM