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Thread: Dhamma Nature

  1. #1

    Dhamma Nature

    This is a talk which was given by Ajahn Chah in 1977.


    Dhamma Nature


    Sometimes, when a fruit tree is in bloom, a breeze stirs and scatters blossoms to the ground. Some buds remain and grow into a small green fruit. A wind blows and some of them, too, fall! Still others may become fruit or nearly ripe, or some even fully ripe, before they fall.

    And so it is with people. Like flowers and fruit in the wind they, too, fall in different stages of life. Some people die while still in the womb, others within only a few days after birth. Some people live for a few years then die, never having reached maturity. Men and women die in their youth. Still others reach a ripe old age before they die.

    When reflecting upon people, consider the nature of fruit in the wind: both are very uncertain.

    Continues at the link:

    http://www.ajahnchah.org/book/Dhamma_Nature1.php

    Any thoughts?

    Please can you respond to the whole article at the link, not just the beginning of it which is reproduced above!



  2. #2
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    Physical Life is unsertain, We do not need to look for the dhamma because it is within us, around us. All we need to do is to understand what we see is unsertain in this physical world. To end the samsara we must practice the dhamma. To be the dhamma, to become a buddha.
    When we grasp the dhamma it open up from within.

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    Forums Member Olderon's Avatar
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    Not only within.....do we find the truth (dhamma: Things as they actually are.) But also exterior to our minds that as we are but component of the totality of existence of which Buddha spoke in his explanation entitled " A hand full of leaves." The simpassa sutta @ access to insight.com

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Cultivator View Post
    Physical Life is unsertain, We do not need to look for the dhamma because it is within us, around us. All we need to do is to understand what we see is unsertain in this physical world. To end the samsara we must practice the dhamma. To be the dhamma, to become a buddha.
    When we grasp the dhamma it open up from within.


    What's your opinion of the Ajahn Chah article, Cultivator?

  5. #5
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    That it is true teaching the way Buddha Sakyamuni would have seen it.
    The answer above was only answer to what was understood when reading the words of Ajhan Chah

  6. #6
    Technical Administrator woodscooter's Avatar
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    The talk given by Ajahn Chah has the title "Dhamma Nature". It is about the uncertainty of everything -the nature of things is uncertain. All the way from fruit on trees to monks and novices -all is uncertainty.

    All things are impermanent, having decay and dissolution as their natural condition. A thought is simply a mental impression that arises and passes away.

    When we can see this, then we can see Dhamma. If one sees nature, one sees Dhamma.

    Ajahn Chah goes on to say "We must be mindful of everything we do, for we become the inheritors of our own good or evil actions", and "If beings have good conduct and are loyal to the Buddha-Dhamma, then those beings will never be short of virtue and goodness".

    This may or may not be true. It certainly is basic Buddhist teaching, but it doesn't follow from the principle that Dhamma is seen in nature, and that nature embodies uncertainty. It's a switch of subject, in a way. Or, from another point of view, how can we know "those beings will never be short of virtue and goodness" with any certainty?

    The story of King Mahajanaka is an interesting one. He took inspiration from a mango tree with no fruit, and took ordination so he would not be troubled by the worries and difficulties of the world.

    What's the point of a mango tree with no fruit? Isn't it like a king who relinquishes his obligations? Here's a simile from the same text:

    Therefore, we are beings who have much merit and good fortune in having heard the teachings of the Buddha. The orchard already exists, the fruit is already ripe. Everything is already complete and perfect. All that is lacking is someone to partake of the fruit, someone with faith enough to practice!
    A tree with no fruit is not part of a perfect and complete orchard. King Mahajanaka took his cue from nihilism.

    Now, I take no pleasure in dissecting a talk by the venerable Ajahn Chah. He was a most-respected teacher in his lifetime.

    But the teachings that we hear and accept must stand up to some degree of analysis. I would be very happy to read any posts refuting my opinions.

  7. #7
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    I just read the story. What a particularly unpleasant person the king was. Being a king was far too much trouble so he decided to let the kingdom go to rack and ruin as long as his own mind was calm. It would have been a better story if he saw how to halt possible invaders by thinking thinks through mindfully.

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