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Thread: Can we forgive the unforgivable?

  1. #11
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    "The Arahat said he could not forgive the man standing before him because he is not the same man that harmed him."

    My interpretation Arahat = "Self liberated"

    Liberated from what? From delusions of ignorance, based upon seeing dependently arisen phenomenon as inherently existing and permanent.

    The Arahat sees impermenance perfectly and thus can say from this higher view that previous angry man is gone and has turned his mind towards cherishing the Arahat by seeking forgiveness his heart/mind is in a state of renunciation from his anger and has been liberated of it (at least towards the Arahat).

    So Arahat knows better than to hold onto a projection of the angry man from yesterday as he is not there today.
    Since the anger the man had was dependently arisen on the false perceptions mistaken view in this example was he though Arahat was a thief and not a liberated Arahat.

    The Arahat can understand and offer a truth teaching to the man but it not possible to forgive an illusion. In fact it as Arahat his mind was never disturbed so no harm ever took place to forgive ultimately. But out of compassion for the man who suffers in attachment to his wealth and hatred for giving he spins the wheel of dharma and gives him and us this beautiful teaching. That transcends space and time and continues to benifit us all who hear it today.
    Last edited by Aloka; 02 Feb 19 at 09:25. Reason: title to post removed as this facility is for topic titles only.

  2. #12
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    Yes it is possible to forgive everything.

  3. #13
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    Is it possible there is only one kind of forgiveness? That we forgive ourselves, as I believe that we (ourselves with our worldly mind) create this illusion world we live in. Is it really another offending us, or just what our mind has created and caused in this world for spirit growth? Not sure how this aligns with the teachings is Buddhism, but I found this question fascinating to think about?

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Tuxedo View Post
    Is it possible there is only one kind of forgiveness? That we forgive ourselves, as I believe that we (ourselves with our worldly mind) create this illusion world we live in. Is it really another offending us, or just what our mind has created and caused in this world for spirit growth? Not sure how this aligns with the teachings is Buddhism, but I found this question fascinating to think about?
    Hi Tuxedo,

    Did you read the article at the link #1?

    Karma Yeshe Rabgye concluded:


    Firstly, you ask forgiveness of all those you may have harmed, through your actions of body, speech and mind.

    Secondly, you then offer forgiveness for any harm others have caused you through their actions of body, speech and mind.

    Finally, you offer forgiveness to yourself for any harm you have done to yourself.

    Mentally recited these phrases as many times as you can. This practice will help you clarify and purify the intention to be a forgiving person, no matter how difficult the circumstances.

    Remember, when you are carrying revenge and resentment around in your heart you are hurting yourself. If someone has hurt us, why would we hurt ourselves even more? That makes no sense. Revenge is only going to inflict more pain and suffering on ourselves. Holding onto feelings of revenge is like eating rat poison and waiting for the rat to die.



  5. #15
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    I don't think that there is a definition of forgiveness that I really understand. Why does it come as a pair, 'forgive and forget'? If you forgive does it matter whether you forget or not? Are there some things it is impossible to forgive? Or to forget, if you've forgiven? Maybe for such things it's enough not to have negative feelings.

  6. #16
    Forums Member KathyLauren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by philg View Post
    I don't think that there is a definition of forgiveness that I really understand. Why does it come as a pair, 'forgive and forget'? If you forgive does it matter whether you forget or not? Are there some things it is impossible to forgive? Or to forget, if you've forgiven? Maybe for such things it's enough not to have negative feelings.
    The hippie philosopher Stephen Gaskin wrote, in an essay on forgiveness which agrees with the quote in the first post of the thread, that "The thing about forgiveness is that, if you forgive, you don't have to forget." Wise words.

    "Forgive and forget" is a nonsensical pairing. The way it is usually applied is that you pretend to forgive, and then you pretend to forget, and you sweep the unresolved event under the rug, where it decays and rots until the overpowering stench brings it back to the surface again.

    A consequence of real forgiveness is that you can talk about the event with the offender without anger.

    Om mani padme hum
    Kathy

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