Thread: Ekapol Chanthawong - an inspiration

  1. #1
    Forums Member Gaedheal's Avatar
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    Ekapol Chanthawong - an inspiration

    The rescue of the 12 Thai soccer team boys is incredible, but even more incredible was the calmness of the boys when the first divers found them. They had been over a week in pitch darkness 4km inside the caves, with no way to get out, with almost no food and no idea what was going to happen.
    Their coach, Ekapol Chanthawong, had spent 10 years in a Buddhist monastery after being orphaned aged 12.
    He taught the boys to meditate. That's what they were doing when the divers emerged from the water to find them. The oxygen concentration in the cave was 16% and they were starving. But they were completely calm thanks to their coach.
    I can't wait to hear the whole story.

    https://www.vox.com/2018/7/9/1754851...ation-buddhism

  2. #2
    I'm very suprised that the football coach was even allowed to take 12 inexperienced children into underground caves which were prone to flooding in the first place. Its also really tragic that one of the rescuers lost his life as a result of that misjudgment .

    Thankfully the efforts of many others risking their lives in terrible conditions enabled the boys to be rescued eventually, after they'd been trapped underground on a ledge in the dark, for 17 days. Its good if the coach managed to keep them calm with meditation because as their families were likely to be Buddhists anyway, it wouldn't have been something they'd never heard of. However, I can't help but think that the experience of being trapped in the dark for so long with the possibility of water levels rising even further, may have a long term effect on some of them psychologically. I really hope not.

    There's an article in The Guardian about the rescue:

    https://www.theguardian.com/news/201...f-trapped-boys


    Health officials said that some of the first boys freed had elevated white-blood cell levels, indicating infections, and two showed signs of pneumonia but were responding well to treatment.
    and:


    Doctors said the first eight boys to be released would spend at least one week in hospital recuperating. Images of the boys seen by the Guardian showed them in hospital beds with white patches over their eyes, which doctors said was a precaution to help them adjust to the light after more than two weeks in a near-pitch black environment.


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    Forums Member Gaedheal's Avatar
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    Of course the whole idea of going into the caves in the first place was crazy, and that was the responsibility of the coach. They were going in to put their names on a particular place inside that's fairly common, and the warning signs said no entry after July 1st, so a week before was pushing it. But the coach I think redeemed himself by forgoing food and helping the boys cope in otherwise impossible circumstances. The whole operation to find and rescue them was a purely human-helping-human good news story and one man died doing so. There are so few news items like this one, selfless humanity at its best.
    My point was the coach helped the boys cope and eventually survive. And it seems he did so by teaching meditation.

    On a more cynical note....I was watching CNN I think 2 days ago (when 8 of the 13 had been rescued) and they were talking about movie rights to the story!!
    Nasty reality is never far away!!

    LorcŠn.

  4. #4
    On a more cynical note....I was watching CNN I think 2 days ago (when 8 of the 13 had been rescued) and they were talking about movie rights to the story!!
    Oh no!

  5. #5
    I read somewhere that the boys had to be sedated before they were guided out of the cave and there's an article mentioning that on the BBC website:


    Cave rescue: Key questions answered:


    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-44799779

    Excerpt:

    How they carried semi-conscious or very drowsy boys through the technically challenging early stages of the journey out, with a lot of diving in narrow passages, we do not know.

    At times they may have been strapped to a diver's body. Later they were strapped on to a stretcher and suspended from a rope pulley system attached to the cave roof.

    The entire operation was complex, innovative and very bold. Nothing like it has been attempted before. Some of those involved described the tasks undertaken by the core divers, who carried the boys out, as superhuman.
    .Regarding Ake the football coach who took them on the unplanned outing into the caves :

    Coach Nop said Ake may be asked to go back to being a monk for a while, something Thais typically do as a kind of penance, or to replenish or cleanse themselves spiritually.

    Such a move would make a lot of sense to Thais, and he would likely be allowed to resume life as normal after that.

    Hoping everyone that was involved fully recovers from their experiences in the caves and has a long and happy life in the future.




    .

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    Forums Member justusryans's Avatar
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    I was very happy to know that they were finally rescued. It showed human nature at itís best. Iím not surprised the Thai people were so involved in the rescue, they truly live their Buddhism every day. One has only to visit to see this.

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