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Thread: Do you have a daily Buddhist practice?

  1. #1

    Do you have a daily Buddhist practice?

    Dear friends,

    1.Do you have a daily schedule for your Buddhist practice or not, and if so which do you prefer? (e.g. meditation, devotional chanting, mantra recitation, reading scriptures, etc)

    2. Do you feel its beneficial, and in what way ?


    With metta,

    Aloka

  2. #2
    Forums Member Olderon's Avatar
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    1.Do you have a daily schedule for your Buddhist practice or not, and if so which do you prefer? (e.g. meditation, devotional chanting, mantra recitation, reading scriptures, etc)
    Or not!

    Study: Reading and answering questions for various forums. Reading, studying and discussing various suttas , usually in response to questions or issues raised in discussions.

    Meditation: As the opportunity arises.

    When possible, attend local ecumenical meditation and study group locally. Members are from varied traditions: Theravada, Chin, Zen, Tibetan, and curious visitors, who wish to learn about Buddhist practice.

    Avoid chanting as it seems to be mindless and my goal is to be more mindful.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Olderon
    Chin
    Haven't heard of that tradition before, Ron

    - I guess you meant "Chan"

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    Forums Member ScottPen's Avatar
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    I'm new to practicing. My meditation practice has not yet proven to be daily, however I would like to carve it into each day. I've been trying to figure out what part of each day makes the most sense. What I do daily is listen to or watch at least one talk given by a teacher.

    Since the "Is it beneficial" question seems to be aimed at what is practiced daily, I'll answer that specifically. My daily ingestion of a dharma talk is helping me practice during the rest of my day. I'm a new practitioner and I've found that these talks are providing me with advice and methods to incorporate mindfulness and the concept of anatman into my daily life.

  5. #5
    Hello and welcome ScottPenn and thank you for sharing your new practice with us.

    Its a good idea to investigate some Buddhist centres in order to practice with a group and get some one-to- one personal instruction from a Buddhist teacher, if possible.

    Quote Originally Posted by ScottPenn
    ...the concept of anatman...
    "Anatman" (Sanskrit) in Mahayana is known as "anatta"(Pali) in the early Pali Canon suttas and this transcript of a short talk by Ajahn Sumedho might be useful for you to add to your other resources :

    "Self-view, Personality and Awareness":

    https://www.dhammatalks.net/Books9/A...ersonality.htm


    With metta,

    Aloka

  6. #6
    Forums Member ScottPen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aloka View Post
    Hello and welcome ScottPenn and thank you for sharing your new practice with us.

    Its a good idea to investigate some Buddhist centres in order to practice with a group and get some one-to- one personal instruction from a Buddhist teacher, if possible.
    This response has gotten longer than I expected, thanks in advance for reading and taking it in.

    Thanks for the resource and advice, Aloka. I've found that listening to talks given by teachers in the Vipassana Movement to be the most helpful so far, as well as the book "Why Buddhism is True" by Robert Wright. I visited a beginner's service at a local Rinzai zendo recently... I'm grateful for the peaceful environment and 20min zazen-10min kinhin-20min zazen format that I experienced there. Also the many types of cushions and benches along with posture correction were really helpful! I've gotta figure out my seating at home. I didn't feel connected to the chanting and ceremony of it, but I believe I'll give it a few more tries in the interest of keeping an open mind. I really did not like the harsh sounds of wood smacking wood that signified the beginning of the ceremony and the beginning of the kinhin! Maybe if I get a little insight into the purpose of those aural experiences I may be able to set my aversion aside.

    I've found that Tara Brach's IMCW organization holds a weekly talk/guided meditation/mindful movement gathering here in Baltimore. An auspicious discovery! Perhaps I'll find my sangha there. I used to have a very close-knit community of friends with whom I shared many experiences and common views, but being a part of that informal community led to more suffering than lack thereof. Starting a family inspired me to separate, begrudgingly at first, from my close association with that group of people. My life has certainly benefited from this decision, but I miss very much the sense of community and shared experience with peers that I don't feel solely from my roles as "Dad," "Husband," or "Employee." I imagine that a "devil's advocate" might point out that I should think about my attachment in this context... but I feel that I'm not craving or clinging, rather open to the possibility of benefiting practice and well-being. Over the years, wanting to feel that sense of community has, unfortunately, led to an enormous amount of daydreaming and clinging to the past. There are also an assortment of Tibetan centers here, and I plan on paying them a visit as well.

    The practice is really where I'm feeling without direction, and I wonder if a sangha and interaction with a teacher will help... I'm sitting and practicing mindful meditation mostly... breath-watching, noticing thoughts and senses and dismissing them. I'm not impatient for something else, but I am curious about the experience of other "styles" of meditation. I have a tendency to immerse myself so completely in anything new, subsequently feeling overwhelmed by it, and burning out... I think some guidance will help me pace myself into a healthy practice.

    Thanks for reading, and of course I welcome any insight.

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    Forums Member Olderon's Avatar
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    Oops! Yes, there is Chan (not Chin),

    But there is also "Shin":

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J%C5%8Ddo_Shinsh%C5%AB

  8. #8
    Forums Member justusryans's Avatar
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    Yes, I do a daily practice.

  9. #9
    Forums Member Olderon's Avatar
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    Interestingly, my wife and I attended a lecture given by a health coach, an ex-nurse, who was sharing her experience with us geezers at our Seniors Club regarding mindfulness and meditation. It was well presented and turned out that we both had contact with Tich Nat Hahn in Vietnam before he became known world-wide as Master Hahn.

    At the meeting was a woman who was concerned about the concept of "letting go", because her problems were much too important to leave unattended. As you can imagine, the meeting then got redirected to solving her issues rather than staying on topic. So, the reason I bring this up is because I was reminded that part of my daily practice involves sharing basic concepts in Buddhism to the effect of correcting common misconceptions on the part of the general public. Kamma / karma and karmic consequences is one of those prime misconceptions. Also, the topic discussed: Letting go. I also brought up the practice of mental equanimity, but that was not well received, because personal problems and even the issues discussed in the evening news are far too important to folks, who need something to worry about. CNN, MSNBC, CBS. and FOX seem to cultivate those concerns in order to stay in business.

    ....just saying. ; )

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    I do sitting meditation every day, normally for 10 or 15 minutes, sometimes but not very often 20. I used to attend a Buddhist Center to meditate once a week and I'm aiming to do it again in the near future. I also do what a book I read years ago calls "spot meditation", very short session of mindfullness less than 1 minute long that I can do when I am at work or queueing at the supermarket, but at work I tend to get distracted and I don't do this as regularly as I'd like. One of these spot meditations is about letting go and this one I do much more regularly.

    I'm not at all interested in mantras, chantings etc. Bringing with me a portable collection of commented sutras or listening to podcasts could actually be a good idea to spend few minutes a day to think about topics important for me.

    Something I would really like to improve are other kinds of practice, especially cultivating more awarness of thoughts and emotions, body sensations etc and right speech. I do keep a little diary to help me but in a busy day I only have few minutes to set aside for it, so I don't feel it's an actual practice as it should. Do you guys do this? And if yes, how do you find the time and concentration when your daily routine requires nearly all your energies? Do you have methods you'd like to share?

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