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Thread: Is Enlightenment Delusional?

  1. #11
    Forums Member ScottPen's Avatar
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    All I know is that I'm trying to follow the 8fold path in order to reduce suffering. Enlightenment? Who knows? Not me.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Polar Bear View Post
    I enjoyed watching the video but I question whether awakening really consists in knowledge arising from some experience of a “deeper” reality. My current thinking is that any experience in meditation is of purely instrumental value insofar as it leads to the subsidence of greed, hate, and delusion (delusion being ignorance of the 4 noble truths and being under the influence of the 4 vipallasas). Of course, I haven’t had any experiences in meditation akin to what Brad was talking about so to that extent my current thinking is uninformed.
    No. There is no new knowledge, but an experience giving you the chance to see the same things in a different way. The experience is beyond conscious thought, so there is no possibility of gaining new facts about the world. It is only when conscious experience returns that the brain tries to make sense of what happened, and to 'fill in the blanks' with suggestions as to what it might mean.

  3. #13
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    Like some subjects, talking about enlightenment goes nowhere fast. Unlike the biblical injunction to seek and you will find, I am quite sure that seeking enlightenment is the surest way to never experience it. Now, I like theoretical discussions as much as the next person, but can't see much benefit in exploring what enlightenment is or is not except through our practice. I like Brad's talks, but they're just Brad's talks, not the dharma. I'm sure he is as delusional as you or I. It's just part of what it's like to be human. If we weren't delusional, we wouldn't be on this forum! We are all seeking to cut through that delusion though. Good stuff.

  4. #14
    "Nibbana" - an article by Gil Fronsdal of the USA Insight Meditation Centre, might be of interest:

    https://www.insightmeditationcenter....icles/nibbana/



  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aloka View Post
    "Nibbana" - an article by Gil Fronsdal of the USA Insight Meditation Centre, might be of interest:

    https://www.insightmeditationcenter....icles/nibbana/

    Good article for anyone interested in a Therevadan take on nibbana. The idea that samsara is a process rather than a place is fascinating. We attain nibbana when we have ended the process which brings about our suffering, rather than having attained something. We do this by entering a dimension of consciousness which is totally independent of circumstances in the world or within ourselves, and become "unestablished", free from any clinging.

  6. #16
    In his book "Path to Buddhahood" Tibetan Buddhist teacher Ringu Tulku said that nirvana is total wisdom and understanding about the true nature of samsara. Samsara is a word for our state of suffering and confusion, and when we undersand how things really are, then we no longer suffer. He also said that they're not two separate places or locations.

    http://ebooks.readbook5.com/book.php...ngs+on+Gampopa

    In his article "Samsara" Bhikkhu Thanissaro has said:

    Samsara literally means "wandering-on." Many people think of it as the Buddhist name for the place where we currently live — the place we leave when we go to nibbana. But in the early Buddhist texts, it's the answer, not to the question, "Where are we?" but to the question, "What are we doing?" Instead of a place, it's a process: the tendency to keep creating worlds and then moving into them. As one world falls apart, you create another one and go there. At the same time, you bump into other people who are creating their own worlds, too.

    https://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/...o/samsara.html
    There doesn't seem to be any contradiction, as the Tibetan Buddhist view is that "Samsara" is a cycle of ignorance and mental confusion - which is the continuing process mentioned above by a Theravada teacher. (and that neither Samsara or Nirvana are actual places, they're mental states).



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