Thread: Mowing the lawn

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    Mowing the lawn

    I try to do everything without anticipation of gain. When I eat, I try to just eat. When I walk, I try to just walk. I try to keep my mind on what I am doing without forecasting why I'm doing it. Today I was mowing the lawn. I was hot and drenched with sweat. I felt uncomfortable and I wanted to be finished. I feel irritated now, first that I was so impatient and dualistic in my thinking, and second that I'm still dwelling on it.

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    Hi iMoose

    The mind is quite tricky isn't it

    Quote Originally Posted by iMoose View Post
    I try to do everything without anticipation of gain.
    Trying to do something is an attempt to control, as you are finding out, we have very limited control over our minds

    When I eat, I try to just eat. When I walk, I try to just walk. I try to keep my mind on what I am doing without forecasting why I'm doing it. Today I was mowing the lawn. I was hot and drenched with sweat. I felt uncomfortable and I wanted to be finished. I feel irritated now, first that I was so impatient and dualistic in my thinking, and second that I'm still dwelling on it.
    I think you have described well the process of seeing dukkha, you had set an expectation, when that expectation was frustrated, you became disillusioned and find you are now ruminating over the perceived failure

    It can be seen as a valuable lesson, as you became aware of your reactivity, how the mind triggered the unpleasant feeling around the physical circumstances, you can see clearly the held belief that caused the dukkha

    The path is gradual, progress is best made with wisdom and compassion, especially for yourself

    By developing the seven factors of enlightenment (http://www.dhammatalks.net/Books/Ven...ightenment.htm), particularly a non-judgmental mindfulness and a investigative curiosity, you can begin to develop wisdom around your beliefs and habitual patterns of behaviours, developing more skilful ways and habits making life easier for yourself and others

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    Hi iMoose,

    Thanks for sharing that episode with us. I agree with McKmike when he says that the frustration you felt was an example of suffering arising from the activity in your mind.

    Mind you, we all do this. I sometimes want to get a task finished, I become impatient to see it finished, I lose concentration on the task itself because I'm thinking how I want to see the end of it. And when it's over, I find that I had not completed it very well at all!

    There's no point in looking back over what's done. All we can gain is the awareness of how it was. And it sounds as if you have already noticed how it was.

    Next task, new opportunity. Notice how you feel as you do it. Remain in the here-and-now. If you feel hot and sweaty, relax and say to yourself "I feel hot and sweaty".

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    Thanks all! The mind is tricky. I'm smirking because each response added dimensions that I hadn't considered. In the very usage of my language my mind's deception was revealed. I'm really amazed at what you've experienced and am grateful that you shared. Even though I shouldn't care, I am excited for what lies ahead on this path. There is no good or bad. There is only the value I assign to phenomenon.

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    Forums Member Gaedheal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by McKmike View Post

    By developing the seven factors of enlightenment (http://www.dhammatalks.net/Books/Ven...ightenment.htm), particularly a non-judgmental mindfulness and a investigative curiosity, you can begin to develop wisdom around your beliefs and habitual patterns of behaviours, developing more skilful ways and habits making life easier for yourself and others
    Apologies for going off the original post, but I'm reading through the link you sent McKmike and finding it very good. Is it an interview with Venerable Bhante Vimalaramsi ? Someone "S" interjects now and then and there's times given. Just wondering if it's a videoed interview and where I might find it (though reading it is fine).
    Thanks for posting it.
    Lorcán.

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    Hi Gaedheal

    As far as I know it was not videoed, however there are quite a few video's of Bhante Vimalaramsi on you tube

    Glad you enjoyed the talk

    McKmike

  7. #7
    Hi Gaedheal,

    I've found a video of Ajahn Amaro giving a talk on "Seven Factors of Enlightenment".(mentioned by Mike in #2)which might be worth watching.

    I've attended quite a lot of his talks and they're usually really good. Some of them are now on YouTube and others can be found on the UK Amaravati Monastery website.






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    Forums Member Gaedheal's Avatar
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    Thanks Aloka. I'll watch that later.

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    iMoose.

    I'm new round here, so forgive the intrusion, but I think in terms of your grass-cutting activities it's a question of priorities.

    I mean, if you were feeding the hungry, or saving the planet, then maybe you should have carried on, sweat-drenched and too hot, but mowing the lawn?

    My recommendation would have been to have said 'Sod it, it's only bloody grass,' and gone and sat in the shade and had a cold tea.

    With happiness,

    Allen.

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    Hi Allen,
    You're not intruding. Thanks for your thoughts. My perspective and how I'm training my mind is to perceive reality for what it is truly. The 3rd seal is that that, no compound phenomenon has inherent value, because compound phenomenon are inpermanent.

    There may be situations that I can't walk away from. Situations that, under my current mind frame, cause me to suffer. To end suffering I must learn that there is nothing inherently good or inherently bad, only what I have trained myself to be true.

    As long as I'm aware of these truths it will not matter that I wade through crystal clear refreshing springs or I cross a bed of coals, I will not suffer. That is my understanding of the Buddha's teaching.

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