Thread: Searching for sadness

  1. #1
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    Searching for sadness

    Greetings!

    I have been studying Buddhism for about 2 months now, and very much consider myself a beginner. Recently, I have been compelled to seek out sadness. I'll spend hours watching sad YouTube videos and reflecting on sadness in the world. This often makes me cry, which is often my intention for some reason. I always feel much better afterwards, too.

    My whole life I've tried my best to avoid sadness. But now, I can only describe it as a fascination.

    Can anyone offer any explanation as to why I am finding myself wanting to see and experience sadness? Is this natural? Does anyone else experience this?

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Davidster8
    ....Recently, I have been compelled to seek out sadness. I'll spend hours watching sad YouTube videos and reflecting on sadness in the world. This often makes me cry, which is often my intention for some reason. I always feel much better afterwards, too.

    My whole life I've tried my best to avoid sadness. But now, I can only describe it as a fascination.

    Welcome to BWB Davidster8,

    I think its good to reflect on all aspects of life, but I don't know if its such a good idea to keep seeking out everything that's sad in the world for hours at a time, so that it becomes "a fascination." Its possible that you could end up creating an imbalance which might not be so good for your health.

    I recommend reading through this little booklet "The Four Noble Truths" by Ajahn Sumedho. (I'm assuming you already know that the historical Buddha taught the Four Noble Truths)

    excerpt:
    THE FIRST NOBLE TRUTH

    (The Buddha said): What is the Noble Truth of Suffering? Birth is suffering, aging is suffering, sickness is suffering, dissociation from the loved is suffering, not to get what one wants is suffering: in short the five categories affected by clinging are suffering.

    There is this Noble Truth of Suffering: such was the vision, insight, wisdom, knowing and light that arose in me about things not heard before. This Noble Truth must be penetrated by fully understanding suffering: such was the vision, insight, wisdom, knowing and light that arose in me about things not heard before.

    This Noble Truth has been penetrated by fully understanding suffering: such was the vision, insight, wisdom, knowing and light that arose in me about things not heard before.

    [Saÿyutta Nikàya LVI, 11]



    The First Noble Truth with its three aspects is: “There is suffering, dukkha. Dukkha should be understood. Dukkha has been understood.” This is a very skillful teaching because it is expressed in a simple formula which is easy to remember, and it also applies to everything that you can possibly experience or do or think concerning the past, the present or the future.

    Suffering or dukkha is the common bond we all share. Everybody everywhere suffers. Human beings suffered in the past, in ancient India; they suffer in modern Britain; and in the future, human beings will also suffer... What do we have in common with Queen Elizabeth? – We suffer. With a tramp in Charing Cross, what do we have in common? – Suffering. It includes all levels from the most privileged human beings to the most desperate and underprivileged ones, and all ranges in between. Everybody everywhere suffers. It is a bond we have with each other, something we all understand.

    When we talk about our human suffering, it brings out our compassionate tendencies. But when we talk about our opinions, about what I think and what you think about politics and religion, then we can get into wars.

    more at the link below:

    http://forestsanghapublications.org/...hn_Sumedho.pdf
    With kind wishes,

    Aloka

  3. #3
    Forums Member JadeRabbit's Avatar
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    Hi Davidster8,

    Surely you must have found enough sadness in the world without seeking it out? You only need to watch 5 minutes of the news to see the terrible things that go on.

    Maybe there are some questions you could ask yourself? Why do you feel fascinated by it? Why have I avoided it in the past? How does that make you feel - compassionate or indifferent?

    I don't know if you practice meditation, but recommend that you take some time out of your day to just sit and reflect on these things. Maybe there is something you can take from your experiences and create a positive motivation to practice 'metta' or loving kindness to others.

    Best wishes on your journey

  4. #4
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    Consider the mind like a garden. Only grow those things that are of benefit and uproot the rest.

    Once a line of thinking is suspect, let it starve on the vine, by literally not giving it another thought.

  5. #5
    Forums Member KathyLauren's Avatar
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    Hi, Davidster8.

    Welcome to BWB.

    To be honest, this search for sadness sounds like something obsessive. This would be something to talk to a psychologist about, rather than some folks on a Dharma forum.

    Om mani padme hum
    Kathy

  6. #6
    Hi all,

    Just a brief note to say that its worth noting that Davidster8 posted this topic six years ago in 2015 and doesn't appear to have returned to the website since then.

    I am therefore closing the thread with thanks to those who contributed ....and with a reminder that new discussion topics are always welcome!



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