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Thread: If you meet a buddha on the road kill him?

  1. #11
    Forums Member Trilaksana's Avatar
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    Here's a Zen Koan that expresses the same thing from another perspective.

    One day when Nangaku came to Baso’s hut, Baso stood up to receive him. Nangaku asked him, “What have you been doing recently?”

    Baso replied, “Recently I have been doing the practice of seated meditation exclusively.”

    Nangaku asked, “And what is the aim of your seated meditation?”

    Baso replied, “The aim of my seated meditation is to achieve Buddhahood.”

    Thereupon, Nangaku took a roof tile and began rubbing it on a rock near Baso’s hut.

    Baso, upon seeing this, asked him, “Reverend monk, what are you doing?”

    Nangaku replied, “I am polishing a roof tile.”

    Baso then asked, “What are you going to make by polishing a roof tile?”

    Nangaku replied, “I am polishing it to make a mirror.”

    Baso said, “How can you possibly make a mirror by rubbing a tile?”

    Nangaku replied, “How can you possibly make yourself into a Buddha by doing seated meditation?”
    Continued at: http://dogenandtheshobogenzo.blogspo...ke-mirror.html

  2. #12
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    Bodhidharma talks about this is in the "Bloodstream sermon"

    Trying to find a Buddha or enlightenment is like trying to grab space. Space has

    a name but no form. It’s not something you can pick up or put down. And you certainly can’t grab if. Beyond mind you’ll never see a Buddha. The Buddha is a product of the mind. Why look for a Buddha beyond this mind?...

    The mind is the Buddha, and the Buddha is the mind. Beyond the mind there’s no Buddha and beyond the Buddha there’s no mind. If you think there is a Buddha beyond the mind’, where is he? There’s no Buddha beyond the mind, so why envision one? You can’t know your real mind as long as you deceive yourself. As long as you’re enthralled by a lifeless form, you’re not free. If you don’t believe me, deceiving yourself won’t help. It’s not the Buddha’s fault. People, though, are deluded. They’re unaware that their own mind is the Buddha. Otherwise they wouldn’t look for a Buddha outside the mind.

    Buddhas don’t save Buddhas. If you use your mind to look for a Buddha, you won’t see the Buddha. As long as you look for a Buddha somewhere else, you’ll never see that your own mind is the Buddha. Don’t use a Buddha to worship a Buddha. And don’t use the mind to invoke a Buddha

  3. #13
    Forums Member Trilaksana's Avatar
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    Thanks for sharing John I enjoyed that. Could you provide a link?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trilaksana View Post
    Thanks for sharing John I enjoyed that. Could you provide a link?
    Sure! Lots of good zen stuff on this site. Lots of other good stuff too. Although the website acts a bit weird sometimes, broken links, etc. If people want to see other stuff, I found it best to just browse to http://www.abuddhistlibrary.com and go from there.

    THE ZEN TEACHINGS OF BODHIDHARMA

    Translated by Red Pine 1987

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rodsent View Post
    If you meet a buddha on the road kill him? What does that mean exactly? I believe it means to not hold onto Buddhist teachings and keep a silent mind as opposed to revolving all these Buddhist concepts.
    What the saying is pointing out, if thoughts pop up, return to your method of practice. Some methods of practice are reciting mantra, koan practice, breath awareness--whatever your teacher provided as a method to return to the present moment. In Chan/Zen, our practice is constantly to remain here and now, here and now. That's why if we see the "Buddha" (concepts) on the "road" (our mind-steam or wandering mind), we have to "kill" (return to our practice method bringing us back to the present moment). This teaching holds true for any conceptualization that pops up in the mind, not just Buddhist concepts. The point here is not to get stuck with the concepts, drop them and return to the present moment. It's so easy to write and talk about, but a challenge in actual practice~

    Hope that helps,
    Mu Chak

  6. #16
    Forums Member tellyontellyon's Avatar
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    An Alternative: If you meet a Buddha on the road, kill her!

  7. #17
    Forums Member inji's Avatar
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    Meeting the Buddha on the road.

    This is the cynical view of Sam Harris but it's not totally without merit.

    "The ninth-century Buddhist master Lin Chi is supposed to have said, “If you meet the Buddha on the road, kill him.” Like much of Zen teaching, this seems too cute by half, but it makes a valuable point: to turn the Buddha into a religious fetish is to miss the essence of what he taught. In considering what Buddhism can offer the world in the twenty-first century, I propose that we take Lin Chi’s admonishment rather seriously. As students of the Buddha, we should dispense with Buddhism."

    Complete article:

    http://www.shambhalasun.com/index.ph...2903Itemid=247
    Last edited by inji; 28 Dec 13 at 15:03.

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