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Thread: Emotional expression & Buddhism

  1. #11
    andyrobyn
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    Agree frank ... expression of emotion whilst not frowned upon in a general sense is not going to change any thing and potentially if we allow our actions to be guided by how we feel, as Aloka has said earlier, we may allow ourselves to be unskillful and worse still believe we are justified in such actions based on how we feel

  2. #12
    Emotions are important. They give us essential and necessary feedback regarding our relationship and interaction with the appearances and circumstances that make up our life. We benefit from experiencing them, listening to them, and expressing them.

    Our practice is to not become enslaved to them - chase, avoid, deny them, or identify by them. In our practice, we note that they arise and dissipate, and that their nature is empty - practicing restraint without reacting as we observe these energies move within us.

    Our on-the-cushion practice of noting these moving energies but not being consumed or driven by them lets us express them naturally and skillfully in ways that are beneficial to daily life rather than dissatisfying and destructive.

    In this way, we're not ruled by our passions and they become valuable gifts and tools.

  3. #13
    I was just looking to see what Ajahn Brahm has to say about emotions in his book ''Mindfulness Bliss and Beyond."

    He says:

    "When you are deluded by emotions, you take them to be important, and 'mine'. You can get so sucked in that you seek even unpleasant emotions like sadness repeatedly. Why is it that many people go to a movie with a box of tissues, knowing, from reviews that it is a tearjerker? It is because they are attached to emotions, delight in them, and identify with them. They don't want to be free.

    Superpower mindfulness focused on emotions uncovers the reality of whether you want to be free or not. It pushes aside your preferences. You recognise that emotions are seductive sirens beckoning you to their treacherous rocks. But in their essence they are but mind objects, causally conditioned, like weather fronts passing overhead, having nothing to do with you. When you see the truth, you are detached from emotions and free from their tyranny. "




    I think this is very true. Certainly in the West we have a tendancy to indulge in emotional reactions to everything. Ajahn Brahm has already given the example of movies and if we look at literature, music etc etc a lot of it is a feast of emotional indulgence over imaginary situations, just for the sake of it. Furthermore we can regard it as somehow 'good' and 'healthy' .

    Opera is an interesting example of that with somebody taking ages to die as they sing an emotional and dramatic aria and so forth...and everybody loves it and has the tissues in action....again and again. So I think we have to examine all of that too, noticing how we have constant reactions to 'entertainments' which are illusory situations anyway.

    Just as 'all the world's a stage' when we follow emotional reactions to 'entertainments' ....so it is with the rest of our lives.

    Disagree with this post ? Watch your reactions.

  4. #14
    Previous Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Replying to Aloka-D:
    from post #13
    There is an article by Ajahn Brahms on you tube called Dealing With The Emotions

  5. #15
    andyrobyn
    Guest
    Opera is samsara personified in my experience .... for those who don't enjoy, this is especially so

  6. #16
    Global Moderator Esho's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Replying to Pink_trike:
    from post #12
    I share this understanding Pink dear,


  7. #17
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    "Opera is samsara personified in my experience...for those who don't enjoy, this is especially so"
    - Thanks, andyrobyn!
    That made me laugh out loud.

  8. #18
    andyrobyn
    Guest

  9. #19
    andyrobyn
    Guest
    Have just read this wonderful explanation on being mindful of our emotions, from the free online book of mindfulness essays by Gil Fronsdal given to us by Aloka in the other thread ....

    " Mindfulness itself does not condemn our reactions. Rather it is honestly aware of what happens to us and how we react to it. The more cognizant and familiar we are with our reactivity the more easily we can feel, for example, uncomplicated grief or straightforward joy, not mixed up with guilt, anger, remorse, embarrassment, judgment or other reactions. Freedom in Buddhism is not freedom from emotions; it is freedom from complicating them. "

    The essay goes on to discuss the four aspects to mindfulness of emotions: recognition, naming, acceptance and investigation.

    More here URL

  10. #20
    Forums Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pink_trike #12:
    Emotions are important. They give us essential and necessary feedback regarding our relationship and interaction with the appearances and circumstances that make up our life. We benefit from experiencing them, listening to them, and expressing them.

    Our practice is to not become enslaved to them - chase, avoid, deny them, or identify by them. In our practice, we note that they arise and dissipate, and that their nature is empty - practicing restraint without reacting as we observe these energies move within us.

    Our on-the-cushion practice of noting these moving energies but not being consumed or driven by them lets us express them naturally and skillfully in ways that are beneficial to daily life rather than dissatisfying and destructive.

    In this way, we're not ruled by our passions and they become valuable gifts and tools.
    Quoted for emphasis. This seems to me to be a wholesome and skillful explanation.

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