Thread: Nibbana

  1. #1
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    Nibbana

    I recently had quite an in depth conversation with a monk regarding nibbana, his view was that the state of nibbana was transcendental and distinct from ordinary consciousness, I believe there are only a few references in the suttas describing nibbana, from what I have read this idea of a transcendental state is not what the buddha actual describes, can any one refer me to the nibbana sutta's or comment on the concept of transcendental mind state that is nibbana

  2. #2
    Hi Mike,

    There's lots of information to be found (including sutta references) in a book: "The Island - An Anthology of the Buddha's Teachings on Nibbana" by Ajahn Pasanno and Ajahn Amaro.

    Its available free in the UK from Forest Sangha Monasteries, or with a donation for postage can be ordered by post from Harnham Buddhist Monastery UK

    http://forestsanghapublications.org/distribution.php

    or it can be downloaded from Forest Sangha Publications:

    http://forestsanghapublications.org/...?id=10&ref=vec

    With metta,

    Aloka

  3. #3
    The Buddha spoke about abandoning lust, hatred and delusion in AN 3.55



    AN 3.55 Nibbāna


    1 Then the brahmin Jāṇussoṇī approached the Blessed One … and said to him:

    2 "Master Gotama, it is said: ‘Directly visible nibbāna, directly visible nibbāna.’ In what way is nibbāna directly visible, immediate, inviting one to come and see, applicable, to be personally experienced by the wise?” an.i.159

    3 “Brahmin, one excited by lust, overcome by lust, with mind obsessed by it, intends for his own affliction, for the affliction of others, or for the affliction of both, and he experiences mental suffering and dejection. But when lust is abandoned, he does not intend for his own affliction, for the affliction of others, or for the affliction of both, and he does not experience mental suffering and dejection. It is in this way that nibbāna is directly visible.

    “One full of hate, overcome by hatred …

    4 “One who is deluded, overcome by delusion, with mind obsessed by it, intends for his own affliction, for the affliction of others, or for the affliction of both, and he experiences mental suffering and dejection. But when delusion is abandoned, he does not intend for his own affliction, for the affliction of others, or for the affliction of both, and he does not experience mental suffering and dejection. It is in this way, too, that nibbāna is directly visible.

    5 "When, brahmin, one experiences the remainderless destruction of lust, the remainderless destruction of hatred, and the remainderless destruction of delusion, it is in this way, too, that nibbāna is directly visible, immediate, inviting one to come and see, applicable, to be personally experienced by the wise.”

    6 "Excellent, Master Gotama! … Let Master Gotama consider me a lay follower who from today has gone for refuge for life.”

    http://suttacentral.net/en/an3.55


  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by McKmike View Post
    I recently had quite an in depth conversation with a monk regarding nibbana, his view was that the state of nibbana was transcendental and distinct from ordinary consciousness, I believe there are only a few references in the suttas describing nibbana, from what I have read this idea of a transcendental state is not what the buddha actual describes, can any one refer me to the nibbana sutta's or comment on the concept of transcendental mind state that is nibbana

    This is an excerpt from a talk given by Ajahn Sumedho in the late 1990's which might be helpful:


    In meditation, you transcend the conditioned process. With intuitive awareness, you are not trying to define or describe the ultimate truth, or deathlessness, or the unconditioned; you cannot describe it. That is why the Buddha used words like ‘unborn’, ‘uncreated’. These are all negations—anatta (not-self), nibbana/nirvana (unconditioned)—and negation stops the mind from clinging to the conditioning that we have acquired, the attitudes, the perceptions that we have depended on and which we use for understanding experience. The ‘mystical experience’, the ‘insight’, the ‘kensho’—all the ways of talking about that realisation of the deathless reality—is indescribable.

    You could say that it is the highest bliss: ‘Nibbana is the highest happiness!’ But that makes it sound refined—highest!—and the mind immediately becomes prepared for some very refined state of happiness—not the happiness of nonattachment but that of a special kind of happiness, something you would get only by refining everything in your experience to a point of there being no coarseness, no unhappiness and unpleasantness.

    In Buddhism we use the term ‘the Middle Way’, or we can say ‘a transcendent path’, but the word ‘transcendence’ also has its problems. We might think of it as ‘getting beyond’—‘I no longer need you; I’ve transcended the world and I’m not interested any more.’ Or it can sound as though we are floating up into the air.

    What all these words point to, however, is changing position from being the personality that is trying to become enlightened to the direct experience of knowing the reality in the present. The experience in the present does not have to be special experience; it does not have to be on a mountaintop with pure air and angels singing in the background. In Zen they have stories of a tile falling off the roof, or of some loud bang, or of something that really isn’t very much at all—*suddenly, the monk awakens, realises, in some very ordinary setting.

    http://buddhismnow.com/2013/08/07/bu...ajahn-sumedho/


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