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Thread: Buddha Nature.

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Kodo308 View Post

    So then by your understanding a sheep will live & die as a sheep, never realizing its buddha potential?




    Readable version at the link...

    http://blog.ninapaley.com/wp-content...ls_raw_960.png



    P.S.

    Is it possible for you to provide a URL source for any quoting that you do, please. (#7)

    .

  2. #12
    Forums Member Kodo308's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aloka View Post
    Is it possible for you to provide a URL source for any quoting that you do, please. (#7)

    .
    No, because it is from a book I own. Would you like me to link to Amazon?

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Kodo308 View Post
    No, because it is from a book I own. Would you like me to link to Amazon?

    Thank you, yes, that'll do. Its just to get an idea of the source if there isn't a PDF or a website.

  4. #14
    Forums Member Kodo308's Avatar
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    Here you go...this is the translation I quoted from. There are several other translations available in English.

    https://smile.amazon.com/Buddha-Natu...s=uttaratantra

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Kodo308 View Post
    Here you go...this is the translation I quoted from. There are several other translations available in English.

    https://smile.amazon.com/Buddha-Natu...s=uttaratantra
    Thanks. There's an online PDF of the same one as yours:


    http://bibleoteca.narod.ru/uttaratantra.pdf

  6. #16
    Its interesting that the very odd " 32 marks of a Perfect Being" are in with the teachings which Asanga was supposed to receive miraculously from Maitreya. (Asanga is said to have lived at the beginning of the 4th century CE.)

    Ajahn Sujato wrote an article about them (independently of the Mahayana text), called "On the 32 Marks" .....

    https://sujato.wordpress.com/2011/04...-the-32-marks/

    Excerpt:


    There is plenty of incidental detail in the Suttas and Vinaya that show that the Buddha was normal in appearance, so any freakish or supernatural interpretation of the marks must be wrong. Leaving a few of the bizarre elements aside, most of the marks are straightforward signs of physical beauty: black hair, white teeth, gold skin, and the like.

    The Suttas themselves attribute the marks to ancient Brahmanical texts, although strangely enough they are not found in any extant Brahmanical works.

    There is some suggestion that they may be Babylonian in origin: one of the early texts that features them (Parayanavagga) speaks of a Brahman called ‘Bavari’, which is just the Pali spelling of ‘Babylonian’; marks and omens of all kinds are rampant in Babylon and related cultures.

    In addition, the 32 marks are closely connected with the idea that the Buddha is a ‘Great man’, who has to choose between spiritual and royal dominion. This choice is first expressed in the myth of Gilgamesh, thousands of years before the Buddha, the most famous myth throughout the Babylonian region.


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  7. #17
    Forums Member Gaedheal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aloka View Post

    I'm also reminded of comments from the section about karma in Ajahn Amaro's little book "Who is pulling the strings?"



    I went to a talk he gave with the same title at Amaravati Monastery - and it was excellent.

    It's so refreshing to read or listen to Ajahn Amaro and anyone else I've come across from Amaravati!!
    Thanks Aloka.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aloka View Post
    How can a sheep attain enlightenment...or a snail ?

    Interesting question. I often think that we are the only creatures with this problem, the need to be enlightened. If Buddhism is about the kind of suffering that meditation and following the path are there to alleviate, then maybe it only applies to those creature which suffer in that way. Maybe the sheep and snail are in a different category, enlightenment-wise. They suffer physically, but don't have the same mental problems. Maybe our problems stem from having a different consciousness, one not a problem to most living things. We need the path, but other living things don't. They are fine as they are and will live and die without experiencing our existential angst.

    Perhaps the traditional Buddhist desire for a human rebirth is mistaken, assuming that if we did come back as a snail we would suffer a separation which, ironically, only really applies to human rebirths. And maybe enlightenment comes with this realization, and then we don't suffer any more. It doesn't matter what happens after we die after all. Except that if we are born with a consciousness that experiences separateness, then let's be born in a Buddha-field! I think that when I say, " May all beings in time and space be enlightened" that's what I mean. That no living thing is left suffering in this way, whatever they are like.

    There are a couple of things in literature that may be relevant. In Kipling's Kim the lama says, "Hit ye not that snake" since the snake has it's own path to follow, as Kim does. Another snake is D. H. Lawrence's, where he throws a stick at the snake then instantly regrets his action, "And so, I missed my chance with one of the lords Of life. And I have something to expiate: A pettiness." That all things not only have their part in the whole, but that we might be the only things unfortunate enough to think of other things as less than us.

    For me, even if we can't get all things enlightened, we can wish for it, and in the wishing become something other than what we were.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by philg
    For me, even if we can't get all things enlightened, we can wish for it, and in the wishing become something other than what we were.
    I always say before and after any practice I do:

    "May all beings have happiness and the causes of happiness, and may they all be free from suffering"

    Sometimes I repeat it mentally when I'm walking down the street, or sing it to different tunes when I'm doing the washing up and so on.



  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aloka View Post
    I always say before and after any practice I do:

    "May all beings have happiness and the causes of happiness, and may they all be free from suffering"

    Sometimes I repeat it mentally when I'm walking down the street, or sing it to different tunes when I'm doing the washing up and so on.


    I remember the first time I did that! I used to have to walk along a busy road, and got annoyed at all the traffic passing by. One day I tried saying that quote to myself while looking at the people in the cars, and it changed the walk. The traffic was still there, but my experience of it had changed.

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