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Thread: Is war ever justified ?

  1. #41
    Global Moderator Esho's Avatar
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    Reply to Aloka # 39,

    Quoted from the article:

    Naturally, there are some times when we need to take what on the surface appears to be harsh or tough action, but if our motivation is good our action is actually nonviolent in nature.

    “On the other hand if we use sweet words and gestures to deceive, exploit and take advantage of others, our conduct may appear agreeable, while we are actually engaged in quite unacceptable violence.”


    In Soto Zen we do not accept this issue about having good intentions and then acting in an unwholesome way. We understand the Eightfold Noble Path as a whole, as an organic teaching. With not such "step by step" method. If the Eightfold Noble Path is well understood and well practiced we can remember that it start with the Right View that is for us the essence of it. This Right View, if accomplished then the rest is given by itself. No violent, no intention for war and killing others are about in the Right View and it is nonsense this common idea of good intentions and unwholesome actions. An Unwholesome action tells that one has not developed Right View and there is no room for "good intentions". Having good intentions isn't about what Buddhism is.

    Gyoji is the essence for this practice and it is very demanding. A huge amout of zazen and discipline is needed. Every body can harbor "good intentions". A good intention is about selfishness. Once Right View is developed there is no such good or bad intentions. You just act acodingly to the Right View. And Right View is devoided of such goodness or badness as it is dispasionate in nature.

    He added: “It is my prayer that all of you may be able to do your duty and fulfil your mission and in due course when that is done to return to your homes and families.”

    And the home and families of the supposed "enemy"?

    There are 380 Buddhists serving in the UK’s armed forces, according to the Ministry of Defence.

    I can't understand who you can tell yourself a Buddhist and to be trained to bare in your mind killing people.

    Any way... This do not surprises me... I have ever felt that the Dalai Lama is another politician with a personal issue.




  2. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by Aloka-D
    Could violence and war ever be justified from a Buddhist point of view?
    There is nothing inherently wrong in it but killing does not agree with Buddhist morality. It's a violation of one of the five precepts no matter what reason it is done for. So, from a moral point of view, it is not right

  3. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by frank
    Yes my point,it would seem that the 'developed' and 'civilized' countries have their economies based on war.
    I would suggest that fear is the motivating factor for maintaining this posture. (Greed is a subsidiary of fear)
    Developed and civilized should mean there is peace and well-being for everyone to begin with. Development is not mere material development gained by economical strength. Fact is, most so called "developed and civilized" societies of modern day are not civilized at all when there is so much corruption, killing, violence around.

  4. #44
    Global Moderator Esho's Avatar
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    Reply to 41 and 41...

    Agree Deshy

  5. #45
    Forums Member clw_uk's Avatar
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    Depends on what path one wants to follow


    If one follows Dhamma then one can never condone or be involved with war since its emmersed in clinging and dukkha



    However if one wishes to follow the way of the world then war can be justified, as in the case of the Allies V the Nazi's


    I think its important to remember that Buddhadhamma is not a comandment. Its not "Thou shal not". Its a teaching of choice, you can choose the world or the Dhamma


    Choose the Dhamma and you are free of Dukkha

    Chose the way of the world and you are bound to dukkha


    So I would say one can justify and even fight in a "just war" as long as one is aware that such a way is not in accord with Dhamma and is bound to dukkha


    metta

  6. #46
    Forums Member clw_uk's Avatar
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    This article influenced me to look up Ashoka, thought this quote after a battle that Ashoka was involved in was quite striking



    What have I done? If this is a victory, what's a defeat then? Is this a victory or a defeat? Is this justice or injustice? Is it gallantry or a rout? Is it valor to kill innocent children and women? Do I do it to widen the empire and for prosperity or to destroy the other's kingdom and splendor? One has lost her husband, someone else a father, someone a child, someone an unborn infant.... What's this debris of the corpses? Are these marks of victory or defeat? Are these vultures, crows, eagles the messengers of death or evil?

  7. #47
    Global Moderator Esho's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by clw_uk
    This article influenced me to look up Ashoka, thought this quote after a battle that Ashoka was involved in was quite striking
    Thanks Craig dear for the quote... there is nothing to tell... its very clear...


  8. #48
    Quote Originally Posted by Aloka-D
    Could violence and war ever be justified from a Buddhist point of view?
    To the extent that there is justification going on, it's not a Buddhist point of view.

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