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Thread: Point me in the right direction

  1. #1
    Forums Member
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    I feel like I've only been a tourist in the world of Buddha and I am ready to live there. I want to practice Buddhism in a more structured way and really concentrate on the fundamentals, I feel what little wisdom I have learnt is fragmented and I don't know how to use it properly. I would really appreciate a link to a site or any books I should buy with all the teachings necessary to following the Buddhas path.

    I actively attempted mindfulness in my everyday life yesterday, but I kept getting lost in the fog of thought. A good way of describing it is like feeling really tired and you try so hard to stay awake, but you keep falling asleep. Until you actually try and live in the moment you just don't realise how hard it is. I know I should start practising meditation, but I can't seem to find the right time at the moment. If anyone could teach me a walking meditation it would be much appreciated.

    I just need a push in the right direction please

  2. #2
    lisehull
    Guest
    Jin, Do you meditate at all?
    Lise

  3. #3
    Global Moderator Esho's Avatar
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    Under the Bodhi Tree
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    Hi Jin Zen,

    I think that maybe where you live there could be several sites about the different buddhist traditions. It is not my case here in México, but anyway... go, visit some of them, explore and see wich tradition fits with you. There are very known good authors like the same Dalai Lama, Thich Nhat Hanh (one of my first Zen "in a book" master), Taisan Deshimaru, Taizan Maetzumi (the founder of where I practice now), Shunryu Suzuki, Jakusho Kwong, Joko Beck.

    You can also try some of the Ancestors like Nagarjuna, Atisha, and in my case Dogen Zengi that is the guide of Zen Soto tradition.

    Others could be Sogyal Rimpoche, Dzongsar Jamyang Khyentse, etc...

    I think you need to read thoughly and to visit places before decideing where and with which tradition you will practice.

    There is Zazen and Jhanas and Samatha and Vipasana systems for meditation.

    Explore and try and reach some good teacher to give you guidance.

    I feel I am not very good at pointing you to your own understanding but Im just guessing and shearing some ideas... Im shure others here will give you better guidance.


  4. #4
    dude
    Guest
    You're doing fine. Start with mindfulness. Just take a minute to remember to observe mindfulness. Once or twice every day.

    Go down to the library and browse books on Buddhism, check one out. If it's hard or boring try another one.

    Think about pursuing the practice and studying with a teacher. Ask lots of questions.

  5. #5
    andyrobyn
    Guest
    Hi Jin Zen,

    Solid suggestions so far that we have been privileged to offer from your kind invitation

    This is my suggestion - and not the way it happened for me, rather the way that I can see currently would be a good way to proceed if you are wanting to take refuge and establish a practice.

    I would suggest beginning investigations with the core teachings of Buddha in the Pali Canon.

    There are some teachers whose teaching are available online and most western people I know find them appropriate - have a look at teachings from Theravada Thai Forest tradition.

    I would then suggest you may wish to go on to investigate some of the different traditions of Mahayana, including Vajrayana.

  6. #6
    Forums Member
    Location
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    Quote Originally Posted by JIN ZEN #1:
    I kept getting lost in the fog of thought. A good way of describing it is like feeling really tired and you try so hard to stay awake, but you keep falling asleep.
    The core of practice should comfortable. We can not stay awake. Don't try to stay awake. Awake is result, not cause. Just do the cause and let mind awake by itself.
    Reading the mind like reading the book. Don't try to read all the time. If we have something to do then put the book down and pause reading.
    Just reader, not editor.
    Awake is the tool to warn the mind that mind sleep. Without awake we don't know that we sleep. Only arahunt can always awake. For us sleep,sleep...,awake,sleep,sleep...,awake,sleep...
    When mind awake, It's only a part of second. If we feel longer, It isn't real awake.
    The cause of awake is the mind remember some kind of status and that status arise to the mind. i.e. For someone that always angry. If they observe the mind when angry arise to mind. Their mind will remember angry status. After that when angry arise to mind then mind awake.
    We will know more detail of angry. We will be found that before angry, there is something arise in thorax.

    For more detail please follow :-
    http://www.buddhismwithoutboundaries.com/index.php?action=vthread&foru m=4&topic=2674


  7. #7
    Previous Member
    Location
    Philippines
    Posts
    539
    Jin Zen,
    I'm a thereavadan,so that influnces my understanding and answer to your question,but would suggest you check out;
    The Way It Is-Index
    The way it is by Venerable Ajahn Sumedho, Amaravati Publications, 1991, ISBN 1 870205 11 1.
    www.amaravati.org/abmnew/documents/the_way_it.../index.html - Cached

  8. #8
    Previous Member
    Location
    Philippines
    Posts
    539
    Jin Zen,
    Another couple of referances are;
    accesstoinsight.org
    and;
    What-Buddha-Taught.net (((((0))))) PEACE THROUGH KNOWING a Handful ...A Collection of Practical Theravada Buddhism materials. Sila, Samadhi, Panna. The Noble Eightfold Path. From here to Release.
    www.what-buddha-taught.net/ - Cached - Similar
    Hope this helps,it's worth remembering that Buddhism is not an intellectual activity,though of course it can be. Maybe a useful way to go is to blend both the intellect and the Practise

  9. #9
    Forums Member
    Location
    United States of America
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    If you're done touring, you need to read the Suttas themselves, and put the commentary to the side for a time. Become familiar with the Pali Suttas. Read the Majjhima Nikaya first, perhaps. While you're doing that, meditate - look up anapanasati for starters.

  10. #10
    Hi JinZen,

    I agree with what Andyrobyn said. You can find lots of links to the Thai Forest Tradition and related material online. There are some talks you can listen to here:

    URL

    There are also talks on the website of Amaravati Monastery, Herts UK where Ven Ajahn Sumedho is abbot here:

    URL

    There's also Chithust monastery in the UK.

    Connected to the Forest Tradition there are offline samatha meditation classes in some places in the UK, teaching walking as well as sitting meditation. Maybe there's one near you. Details here:

    http://www.samatha.org/localgroups/index.html

    You can also visit or stay at the monasteries I mentioned.

    Getting right to the core teachings of Buddha with reading material I'd suggest "In the Buddha's Words- An Anthology of Discourses from the Pali Canon" by Bhikkhu Bodhi.

    URL


    I agree with Sobeh about reading the Pali Canon - however the volumes of the different books of suttas in the canon are quite expensive.

    Its probably best to start with the Middle Length Discourses of 152 suttas (Majjhima Nikaya)

    URL

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