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NovaScotia_Buddhist
11 Jun 11, 14:24
Hello all, just joined your forum. Hm..introduction...should probably be honest, eh? Well I'm a new Buddhist who doesn't read as many Buddhism books as she should because 90% of it goes over my head, and it honestly feels like I'm reading a textbook. I get much more out of watching dvd's. I have been meaning to talk to the people at the Shambala center and see if they teach classes other then yoga and meditation. If I have someone instructing me, I will get 100% more out of it then reading a book.

I don't meditate yet either because I have ADD in real life (ADD, not ADHD, they are not the same thing) and they try to get me to stop thinking or focus on one object. Clearly, they just don't understand. I plan on going to a walking meditation class, but I have been really turned off on meditation teachers because they refuse to understand saying I'm not understanding. *insert frustration* I also don't know what shamabala is and I would like to choose my own path of Buddhism, guess I want to take some "neutral" classes, for lack of better explanation.

Anyways, there's my introduction. I am really a Buddhist (despite some people's arrogant rants directed at me that I'm not. Some people struggle with certain concepts, I just don't believe you become a good little Buddhist overnight), just one who struggles to put what she reads into play. In the last 4 years some of it has rubbed off and life has become generally easier, though my compassion for idiot drivers seems to be still lacking.....

srivijaya
11 Jun 11, 14:36
I just don't believe you become a good little Buddhist overnight), just one who struggles to put what she reads into play.

Hi NovaScotia_Buddhist,
I hope you never become a "good little Buddhist". I've been involved with Buddhism for over 20 years and the more I understand, the less like a good little Buddhist I look.

It doesn't matter what sanctimonious types say about you. They have their little tick boxes and if someone else doesn't tick all of those boxes, well... you know;)

There are all kinds of posters here, some with strong opinions but many with absolutely first rate knowledge, so welcome on board. I haven't got a clue about ADD, so I can learn from you too.

It would seem to be a case of finding what works for you, rather than trying to stuff you into a pre-set hole!

Namaste
kris

Aloka
11 Jun 11, 14:45
Hello NovaScotia_Buddhist, welcome to the group !


I also don't know what shamabala is and I would like to choose my own path of Buddhism, guess I want to take some "neutral" classes, for lack of better explanation.


Personally I would tend to avoid this organisation because from what I've read it appears a little strange with a 'king' and 'queen' and so on. I always understood the kingdom of Shambhala to be a mythical rather than an actual place anyway.

With regard to meditation, there are a couple of resouces in our Study links which you could have a browse of, - but only if you feel like it of course.

with kind wishes,

Aloka-D ;D

daverupa
11 Jun 11, 15:53
Practice anapanasati per the Suttas, but instead of trying to make the breath the sole object of focus, simply practice to keep the breath in mind, no matter what else is happening. Be mindful of the breath even if there are also other things cycling past consciousness, and gently keep practicing returning to the breath in this way. The perpetually roving awareness will, over time, become calmer and therefore it will be easier to settle on the breath, and also make it happen more frequently.

During this practice, remember to let go of the past and the future - this will help sever the stream of proliferating thoughts each time you return to the breath.

Traveller
12 Jun 11, 00:34
Hey, don't know if you've read it but if you want a couple of Buddhist books that read really well and explain things in a fairly plain manner I'd recommend Bhante Gunaratana's Mindfulness in Plain English as a guide to sitting meditation and Eight Mindful Steps to Happiness, a book about the eight fold path by the same author, both are available on Amazon.

BuckyG
13 Jun 11, 04:15
Welcome NovaScotia_Buddhist,
Welcome.
I concur with Srivijaya, Aloka-D, and especially Daverupa.:bunny:

NovaScotia_Buddhist
13 Jun 11, 13:37
Thanks for all the welcomes! And I will check that book out lonely traveler.

stuka
13 Jun 11, 15:56
HI, NSB,

You might take a look at the book, "Mindfulness in Plain English". Google it, the text is available in several places online. When I was first discovering the teachings of the Buddha, that book unlocked the why's and the how's of meditation for me. It is easy reading, straightforward and pretty succinct.

I for one do not consider shambhala to be much of a "Buddhist" group. Only in name, really.

Welcome to BWB :-)

Esho
14 Jun 11, 00:41
So many great advices given for you NSB!

Nothing important to add but just... be welcome to BWB!

;D

Lazy Eye
14 Jun 11, 00:54
NSB,

If I met someone who was always on the wagon (or claimed to be), I think I'd want to walk very fast in the opposite direction.

Welcome!

Esho
14 Jun 11, 01:06
NSB,

If I met someone who was always on the wagon (or claimed to be), I think I'd want to walk very fast in the opposite direction.

Welcome!

Ups! Sorry I realize that I am not undestanding the meaning of the phrase "Not Always on the Wagon".

;D

Lazy Eye
14 Jun 11, 11:02
Ups! Sorry I realize that I am not undestanding the meaning of the phrase "Not Always on the Wagon".

;D

When I taught English many years ago, my students told me that idioms were one of the hardest parts of learning the language.

To be "on the wagon" normally means that one is abstaining from alcohol. But in this thread, it is being used differently -- to mean someone who is a perfect Buddhist, never screws up, and has nothing to learn.

Esho
14 Jun 11, 12:39
To be "on the wagon" normally means that one is abstaining from alcohol. But in this thread, it is being used differently -- to mean someone who is a perfect Buddhist, never screws up, and has nothing to learn.

Thanks Lazy,

If the case, I will run away with you too... :P

londonerabroad
17 Jun 11, 05:08
Hi NovaScotia_Buddhist,

I disagree with some of what has been said here. Being ADD will not prevent you from being a good Buddhist. And yes I think you should go along to the Shambala Center because I think mantras and visualizations will help you in your meditation. Don't give up on the walking meditation, though, this is a very gentle practice of mindfulness just like mantras. Please try to stay off alcohol or drugs but do stay with your medication for as long as you are told to. Don't forget to be patient - Buddhism is a lifelong practice - don't expect immediate results.