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otherright
07 Jun 11, 23:18
Hello everyone. I thought I’d introduce myself and share why I’m here, and what brought me here.

I am a lifelong student of philosophy and religion having majored in it in college. Oddly enough, though out my studies, I only brushed against Buddhism academically. The bulk of my studies were refined to Classical Hellenism and Epistemology in philosophy and Christianity in my religious studies.

Years ago, I came to the epiphany that the reason why I’d consumed so many volumes on Christian theological doctrine was not because I believed, but that I didn’t believe, and was forcing myself to try and maintain a dogma that no longer supported my views.

I began a study in Higher and Lower criticisms and very quickly, the very core of my writings and lectures fell to pieces. So I took another path, one that led me to start a serious research for a book on aspects of human spirituality without dogmatic structures. This led to extended periods of isolation and reflection on the nature of man and the role of religion. I was searching for a faceless religion. I was looking for how science says it works.

About six months ago, while researching I came across a book on the science of Buddhism. It contained about ninety percent of what I’d been observing through my studies. There really is no going back now. I’ve never seen anything more clearly in my life.

So, for about six months now, I’ve been reading Buddhist texts, trying to find what it means to me. It took some time for me to take this step, but now I am ready. I have reached a point where I am seeking the like-minded, where I am looking for direction, and need help.

That is why I have come here, to embrace this new philosophy and to be near those who can help guide me. I hope to find that here. Thank you for taking the time to read this. Any suggestions on where to start.

Esho
08 Jun 11, 03:35
Hello otheright!

Be welcome to the forum ;)


research for a book on aspects of human spirituality without dogmatic structures.

For sure, the teachings of the Buddha are the right place to research. The teachings of the Buddha will never ask you for dogmatism.


I came across a book on the science of Buddhism.

Just curious... with which book you came across?


This led to extended periods of isolation and reflection on the nature of man [...]

IMO, the teachings of the Buddha are about the most accurate "philosophy" about human nature and the pitfalls that an unaware state of mind leads us.

Be welcome!

;D

Aloka
08 Jun 11, 05:58
Welcome otherright !

Thank you for telling us something about yourself and your interest in Buddhism.

Can I suggest you refresh with 'What is Buddhism' and 'The Four Noble Truths' which you will find at the beginning of the topic list in the Beginners forum. There's also a selection of resources in our Study Links section which you might like to browse.

with kind wishes to you,

Aloka-D :hands:

Element
08 Jun 11, 07:34
So I took another path, one that led me to start a serious research for a book on aspects of human spirituality without dogmatic structures. This led to extended periods of isolation and reflection on the nature of man and the role of religion. I was searching for a faceless religion. I was looking for how science says it works.

So, for about six months now, I’ve been reading Buddhist texts, trying to find what it means to me. It took some time for me to take this step, but now I am ready. I have reached a point where I am seeking the like-minded, where I am looking for direction, and need help.

That is why I have come here, to embrace this new philosophy and to be near those who can help guide me. I hope to find that here. Thank you for taking the time to read this. Any suggestions on where to start.
Welcome Otherright

We are certainly happy to help you here. I empathised with your description of a "faceless, scientific" religion. Another name for this is "natural truth".

My personal suggestion on where to start is to begin by asking questions. For the most part, Buddhism encourages the individual/student to take the initiative so the individual/student finds & learns what is suitable for them.

However, the most basic framework of Buddhism is threefold, namely: (1) training in non-harming (morality); (2) training in mental development (concentration); and (3) training in wisdom development (insight). The goal of the threefold training, naturally, is to free or liberate the human mind from suffering and nurture well-being.

Warm regards

Element ;D

otherright
10 Jun 11, 04:22
The Quantum and the Lotus was the book.

I'd been reading everything I could get my hands on with Stevenson and Tucker's research, Hagelin, and Penrose and Hameroff. I was trying to piece it all together to see how it may work physically (or Quantum physically as it were). I would then use it to build a primer. It wasn't exact, but it was very close, so close, I dropped everything I was doing and starting reading Buddhism, and haven't stopped yet. What I've gleaned from that book, in addition to others that I've read, are dead on with how it seems to work, at least how it can be inferred to work.

I still have a long way to go, even more so now. I'd love to pose some questions on here for people's consideration. To get their perspectives on certain issues.

Aloka
10 Jun 11, 05:36
I still have a long way to go, even more so now. I'd love to pose some questions on here for people's consideration. To get their perspectives on certain issues


Hi otherright,

We have a Buddhism for Beginners forum and you are most welcome to ask the group some questions there.

kind wishes,

A-D

srivijaya
10 Jun 11, 16:58
I still have a long way to go, even more so now.
Hi otherright,
I hope not. Don't allow it to be "a long way to go". There's really no need. You already have all requisites.
But still feel free to ask anything you wish. Welcome on board.
Namaste
Kris

BuckyG
13 Jun 11, 04:23
Welcome otherright,

We have some things in common, except I'm not familiar with:

...Stevenson and Tucker's research, Hagelin, and Penrose and Hameroff.

londonerabroad
17 Jun 11, 05:36
Hello Otherright,
Tibetan Buddhism seems to be the closest kind of Buddhism to Quantum Physics, although all schools of Buddhism are ultimately scientific in their outlook.

I suggest you read the following - Buddhism in a Nutshell :

http://www.shambhalasun.com/index.php?option=content&task=view&id=1814