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Aloka
02 Apr 10, 06:16
There's a sentence in the Dhammapada Ch 23 v.331

"Happiness is contentment with whatever there is."

Is this something that's difficult to achieve in the modern world ?

I'd be interested in hearing your comments.

http://www.buddhismwithoutboundaries.com/images/smilies/hands.gif

Slartibartfast
02 Apr 10, 07:39
I think it can be difficult to be content with the world as it is. I mean, can anyone think of a time when there wasn't war of some kind or another? When there wasn't mass suffering, starvation, slavery etc, etc, etc.

Incredibly difficult to be aware of this and not be upset or distraught by it. Being able to see all this and remain mindful and compassionate could not be anything but difficult.

However the Dhammapada also says

"For in this world, hate never yet has dispelled hate. Only love dispells hate. This law is ancient and will last forever."

frank
02 Apr 10, 10:13
Incredibly difficult to be aware of this and not be upset or distraught by it.

Think this comes under the heading "idiot compassion".

Think what can you do about it,(these wars)...nothing.

If there was something you could do,well then there is a case to make,as it is it's just a bad case of beating yourself up. How pointless.

The one thing you can do is work on your practice.
Do what you can do.
Work with what you've got.
The world will go to hell in it's own sweet way,leave it alone.

"For in this world, hate never yet has dispelled hate. Only love dispells hate. This law is ancient and will last forever."

Equanimity will also work.

Sobeh
02 Apr 10, 12:16
"Happiness is contentment with whatever there is."

The Dhammapada is a pretty variegated source for the Dhamma, and this statement is an example.

It can be interpreted in a number of ways, some of which are wholesome and some of which are not. I'll give an example of each, as I see it:

1) Being content with simple food, such as eating ramen noodles and a multivitamin instead of a ritzy market sandwich and a soda with a slice of cheesecake.

2) Being content with the lack of equality for women worldwide.

As you can see, a statement of ethics is really not going to be comprehensive when the original source is inspirational poetry. For example, imagine if the Universal Declaration of Human Rights had been written as a collection of lymericks.

Aloka
02 Apr 10, 13:35
from post #4

I wasn't really looking deeply into the meaning - I just meant a simple present moment happiness.

Theoretically one can be aware of the suffering and inequality in the world, do what one can to help others according to ones personal situation, yet still have a tranquil happy mind, surely?

There's a saying in Tibetan Buddhism about us not being able to cover the whole world with leather so we wear leather shoes instead. (or something like that ! http://www.buddhismwithoutboundaries.com/images/smilies/grin.gif )

Sobeh
02 Apr 10, 15:09
There's a saying in Tibetan Buddhism about us not being able to cover the whole world with leather so we wear leather shoes instead.

I actually enjoy the Tibetan Buddhist custom of having the three marks of existence written on the heels of their boots. http://www.buddhismwithoutboundaries.com/images/smilies/tongue.gif

Esho
02 Apr 10, 18:39
Is this something that's difficult to achieve in the modern world ?

Yes, I feel that for many people this is realy very difficult to understand in a world that makes you think you "need" and infinite amount of "things" so to "be".

Since I was young I was used to discuss spiritualism with my grandmother, hinduism basicaly, so I had the glimps that that kind of achivement was only through a very easy way of life. So I get used to look for that kind of achivement.

Strangely life gave me a very hard test about this kind of desire and I realize it. Nowdays my life is realy much more simple and easy and the experience of contentment with whatever here is and happens gives me a lot of spiritual strength.

http://www.buddhismwithoutboundaries.com/images/smilies/hands.gif

Pink_trike
02 Apr 10, 19:38
"Happiness is contentment with whatever there is."

Is this something that's difficult to achieve in the modern world ?

Yes, imo, this is a mind/heart state that definitely can be experienced in the modern world...if we have a clear understanding of what contentment and happiness really are, and if we create the conditions of mind/heart that give birth to contentment and happiness no matter what appears.

frank
03 Apr 10, 04:19
..if we have a clear understanding of what contentment and happiness really are

Yes Pink though we have to be very careful that what we think of as contentment and happiness really are so...
Sorry,preaching the choir.

Pink_trike
03 Apr 10, 05:17
from post #9



we have to be very careful that what we think of as contentment and happiness really are so...

Agreed

sukitlek
03 Apr 10, 14:29
It is depend on what target of acheivement.
This may more easily to acheive because the acheivement is changed.
The modern world may be the best modern world because we do not do over the exactly requirement.

http://www.buddhismwithoutboundaries.com/images/smilies/hands.gif

gerrymob
03 Apr 10, 14:50
from post #1

Dazzle

I don't think that the Buddha meant that we had to sort the world out to attain contentment and happiness. I believe he meant that we as individuals had to strive for happiness and contentment. Surely Buddhism is for the individual. Sort ourselves out and hopefully we can show others the way to happiness and contentment and eventually enlightenment.

For me. I had a problem for a long time in obtaining an inner peace. Once I let go of the attachment to my ex wife the inner peace came and I suppose contentment. Happiness? What does it mean?

Peace

Gerry

Esho
03 Apr 10, 15:12
Happiness? What does it mean?

Dear Gerry,

In the context of this thread, I feel happiness mean a kind of contentment with what we have and what we are in the here and now.

http://www.buddhismwithoutboundaries.com/images/smilies/hands.gif

Pink_trike
03 Apr 10, 22:00
In my understanding of the possibility offered by the Dharma path, pure happiness is a mind state that is possible if we:

1. understand that our entire vision of existence is a habitual projection of mind due to ignorance of the true nature of reality

2. consciously let go of our habitual fearful and hungry reactions to our own projections - refraining from narratives that incite grabbing at or pushing away.

3. consciously recognize and be present in the neutral nonreactive perceptual space that is cleared when reactive patterns of mind are dissolved away (a state of clarity), and by doing so create the conditions so that the heart's way of knowing (an experience of compassion) arises.

4. This conscious union of clarity and compassion creates the conditions of mind/heart that enable us to refine our intentions and actions in balance with the phenomenal world, which results in contentment.

5. this contentment is the condition of mind/heart that gives birth to real happiness. This is the center of the lotus. Bliss with a capital B. This state of Bliss is sustained by continually turning the wheel described above.

Allis
06 May 10, 15:46
from post #1



from post #1


not for the one who no longer saparates ! http://www.buddhismwithoutboundaries.com/images/smilies/grin.gif

Aloka
07 May 10, 06:45
not for the one who no longer saparates !

Hi Allis,

What methods do you suggest that one should use to achieve this ?

Thanks http://www.buddhismwithoutboundaries.com/images/smilies/hands.gif

Allis
07 May 10, 10:08
from post #16

the method with the quickest results is "doing". At the beginning it may be very hard on some but with daily aplication the initial difficulties will go away after a few weeks or months.
http://www.buddhismwithoutboundaries.com/images/smilies/grin.gif Allis

Aloka
07 May 10, 10:17
from post #17

The method of doing what exactly ? I'm afraid I don't understand what you are refering to.