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justusryans
25 Oct 20, 16:08
I would like to propose a General Buddhism Book Reading Corner. It would not be a book club, more like a general discussion group of either your favorite books, or your most current books. I think this would be a most enjoyable group as well as learn a lot of useful information about what’s worth reading out there.

Mike

:reading:

woodscooter
25 Oct 20, 18:49
That is a very good idea. Not exactly a Book Club, where people all read the same book at the same time and discuss it. That doesn't seem to work here.

But a Book Reading Corner where someone can describe a Buddhist book that they have read, and say something about it, and it may inspire someone else to read the same book, and maybe add their comments later on.

Some Buddhist books are available online for free, which may result in faster responses.

I will create a sub-forum under General Buddhist Discussions, for the Book reading Corner.

Aloka
25 Oct 20, 21:34
I will create a sub-forum under General Buddhist Discussions, for the Book reading Corner.


Thank you Woodscooter..... I've moved the posts - and here we are in the Book Reading Corner!


:reading:

Esho
26 Oct 20, 10:19
I have few books of Buddhism. Not really a great reader; I prefer to meditate more than to read. So, having few books there is only one I consider the basic one for my practice of Zazen; It has been written by late Taisan Deshimaru Roshi and it condense his main teaching and his spirit. It is in Spanish translated from the French. In English its titled "The ring of the Way: Testament of a Zen Master". This beautiful book, in its introductory pages says that if you want to explain Buddhism you do not need to open you mouth; just show the Zazen posture; so simple and clear is this book.

;D

lisehull
26 Oct 20, 16:07
I have few books of Buddhism. Not really a great reader; I prefer to meditate more than to read. So, having few books there is only one I consider the basic one for my practice of Zazen; It has been written by late Taisan Deshimaru Roshi and it condense his main teaching and his spirit. It is in Spanish translated from the French. In English its titled "The ring of the Way: Testament of a Zen Master". This beautiful book, in its introductory pages says that if you want to explain Buddhism you do not need to open you mouth; just show the Zazen posture; so simple and clear is this book.

;D

I have been interested in Zen for some time, but have a lot of trouble understanding its often flowery terminology. That's one reason why I find Brad Warner appealing. Another issue is that, coming from training in Tibetan Buddhism, I find it difficult to bridge their differences. Is this book for the gereal reader, or for someone already schooled in the Zen tradition? :bow:

justusryans
26 Oct 20, 16:56
I am very glad to see you at our new sub - forum. I hope we can all help each other to improve our understanding of Buddhism through Books we have read, books we are currently reading and books we want to read! :reading:

Esho
26 Oct 20, 17:35
I have been interested in Zen for some time, but have a lot of trouble understanding its often flowery terminology. That's one reason why I find Brad Warner appealing. Another issue is that, coming from training in Tibetan Buddhism, I find it difficult to bridge their differences. Is this book for the gereal reader, or for someone already schooled in the Zen tradition? :bow:

Well lise, you have to be a little bit aquainted with Soto Zen, but I still recommend it for the general reader.

lisehull
27 Oct 20, 02:52
Well lise, you have to be a little bit aquainted with Soto Zen, but I still recommend it for the general reader.

I am, so it sounds promising! Thanks! :up2:

justusryans
28 Oct 20, 23:11
I am going to recommend a very good book on Buddhism called “What The Buddha Taught” by Walpole Rahula
A Buddhist monk from Sri Lanka. It incorporates everything a beginning Buddhist to a more advanced Buddhist Practitioner should study. It includes:

The Four Noble Truths, The Five Aggeretates, Noble Eightfold Path, some selected texts including Metta-Sutta, and Dhammapada as well as many other texts and teachings of the Buddha. Lot’s of interesting information. I try to reread it once every year.

I highly recommend it!

:reading:

Aloka
29 Oct 20, 15:48
Hi Mike, I think there are a few places on the internet where it can be downloaded in free PDF. Here's one of them.

http://www.ahandfulofleaves.org/documents/What%20the%20Buddha%20Taught_Rahula.pdf

justusryans
29 Oct 20, 16:00
Thank you for the link Aloka, it’s very appreciated.

Aloka
29 Oct 20, 16:03
Thank you for the link Aloka, it’s very appreciated.

You're very welcome, Mike.

:hands:

dwlemen
02 Nov 20, 16:52
I'd second "What the Buddha Taught" for overall Buddhism. When I did my study-abroad in Thailand, my religion teacher at Thammasat had us read that book. I still haven't found one that explains the essential philosophy better.

(and Thanks for the link to the PDF! I just imported it onto my kindle. Been a while since I've read that, so I'll be starting it again tonight!)


Peace,


-Dave

Esho
14 Jun 21, 11:35
I'm through Zen & Karma by Taisen Deshimaru Roshi. A good book. For Deshimaru Roshi Zen is Zazen and Zazen is essentially Zen so it speaks about Zazen in relation to Karma. His approach is simple: Karma is not a moral problem, it is a psychological one. Good and bad Kamma as happenings in life are because we have a dualistic mind. With Zazen the mind becomes unified and good and bad are trascended. Having trascended good and bad the happenings of life are taken as they are... just things that happen; neither good nor bad.

Its a good reading for those involved in Zen and Zazen.

:hands: