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Aloka
30 Aug 17, 13:33
Secular Buddhist Doug Smith compares early Greek and Buddhist thought. (11 minutes)



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sziAaCI5y1Q&t=3s



Any comments about what he said ?


:hands:

Element
30 Aug 17, 20:54
Plato, through the words of Socrates, asserts that societies have a tripartite class structure corresponding to the appetite/spirit/reason structure of the individual soul. The appetite/spirit/reason are analogous to the castes of society.

* Productive (Workers) – the labourers, carpenters, plumbers, masons, merchants, farmers, ranchers, etc. These correspond to the "appetite" part of the soul.

* Protective (Warriors or Guardians) – those who are adventurous, strong and brave; in the armed forces. These correspond to the "spirit" part of the soul.

* Governing (Rulers or Philosopher Kings) – those who are intelligent, rational, self-controlled, in love with wisdom, well suited to make decisions for the community. These correspond to the "reason" part of the soul and are very few.

Reason is located in the head, spirit in the top third of the torso, and the appetite in the middle third of the torso, down to the navel. Plato says reason and wisdom should govern.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plato

Element
30 Aug 17, 21:02
Imo, it would have been better for the speaker to focus on the tripartite Buddhist framework of mano (intellect), vinnana (consciousness) & citta (emotional heart) for comparative purposes rather than the five aggregates.

The speaker could have also focused on the tripartite Buddhist craving & becoming for comparative purposes, namely, sensual, material & immaterial.

The "divide" between part of the mind that is beneficial from the rest of the mind, which is problematic, is also Buddhist. The impression is Plato was focused on reason (wisdom) versus appetite (defilement; kilesa), which is essentially the same as Buddhism.


"And what, monks, is right effort? (i) There is the case where a monk generates desire, endeavors, activates persistence, upholds & exerts his intent for the sake of the non-arising of evil, unskillful qualities that have not yet arisen. (ii) He generates desire, endeavors, activates persistence, upholds & exerts his intent for the sake of the abandonment of evil, unskillful qualities that have arisen. (iii) He generates desire, endeavors, activates persistence, upholds & exerts his intent for the sake of the arising of skillful qualities that have not yet arisen. (iv) He generates desire, endeavors, activates persistence, upholds & exerts his intent for the maintenance, non-confusion, increase, plenitude, development, & culmination of skillful qualities that have arisen: This, monks, is called right effort.

philg
05 Oct 17, 11:42
I think it's interesting how the 'divide' in the mind for Greek philosophers could be seen as a precursor to the later western ideas of dualism. The interesting question then becomes how far this Cartesian dualism is reflected in Buddhist ideas and practice.