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Aloka
09 Feb 17, 13:25
This is a quote from Stephen Batchelor's book "After Buddhism:Rethinking the Dharma for a Secular Age".




“Gotama takes a noun, “the unconditioned,” and treats it as a verb: “not to be conditioned” by something. He seems acutely aware of the relational nature of language. There is no such thing, for example, as freedom per se. There is only freedom from constraints, or freedom to act in ways that were not possible because of those constraints. Nor is there any awakening per se, but only awakening from the “sleep” of delusion, or awakening to the presence of others who suffer. And there is no such thing as the unconditioned, only the possibility of not being conditioned by something.

Nirvana, therefore, does not refer to the attainment of a transcendent, absolute state apart from the conditions of life but to the possibility of living here and now emancipated from the inclinations of desire, hatred, and delusion. A life not conditioned by these instincts and drives would be an enriched one. No longer would one be the victim of paralyzing habits; one would be freed to respond to circumstances in fresh, unimpeded ways.”

https://www.goodreads.com/work/quotes/44966691-after-buddhism-rethinking-the-dharma-for-a-secular-age
(https://www.goodreads.com/work/quotes/44966691-after-buddhism-rethinking-the-dharma-for-a-secular-age)




Any thoughts ?

ancientbuddhism
15 Feb 17, 16:59
“Gotama takes a noun, “the unconditioned,” and treats it as a verb: “not to be conditioned” by something.”

This is with reference to Udāna 80. A careful examination of un- or negitive markers for nibbāna is given in chapter 12 ‘A discussion of U 80’, p. 51 – 57 in The Psychology of Nirvāṇa by Rune A.E. Johansson (http://www.ahandfulofleaves.org/documents/The%20Psychology%20of%20Nirvana_Johansson_1969_OPT .pdf).

Element
19 Feb 17, 10:40
Nirvana, therefore, does not refer to the attainment of a transcendent, absolute state apart from the conditions of life but to the possibility of living here and now emancipated from the inclinations of desire, hatred, and delusion.

There is nothing new here, i.e., no "rethinking the dhamma". The suttas are quite unambiguous that Nirvana is here & now.

When greed, hatred & delusion end, there is something else there. Stephen seems to be implying desire, hatred & delusion are not utterly destroyed in Nibbana.