PDA

View Full Version : Hi from new teacher member.



podgerl
27 Feb 11, 13:04
Hi. My name is Lizzie and I am teaching Buddhism as part of a religious studies course in England to 16- 18 year olds. We live in an area where there are not that many Buddhists we could talk to so I was wondering if you guys could help us with some of our questions. Is this cheeky of me? We have been looking at Mahayana Buddhism and the path of the Bodhisattva.
My students want to know how a Bodhisattva knows that they are one. I have given them some ideas to answer this on our forum at college but I want them to find out how they can answer their own question...

Other things they have asked about are: when we did the Tibetan wheel of life they want to know why the cockerel represents greed ( and presumably, the snake anger or hatred and the pig ignorance)..where cold they go to find out about this when we have no Buddhists at college to help us?

I know that there are some questions that the Buddha refused to answer, and as a teacher I see myself as a facilitator rather than as someone who has all the answers. I want my students to learn life lessons from my classes and about how they can apply what they learn about Buddhism to their own experience.

Oh, one more thing. We had to learn about the spread of Buddhism and they learnt about Asoka. It is not very inspiring for people of that age group and I am looking for ideas as to how to make it more interesting for them. Or do they just need to know that not everything you learn has to be inspiring?

I will be most grateful for any ideas you can give me. I don't have much time to go on forums but I think that it is a great idea for getting people together. Do you have any forums for teacher people like me?
Love from Lizzie. x

P.S. I am loving teaching Buddhism and am learning loads of things together with my lovely students.

Aloka
27 Feb 11, 13:45
Hi Lizzie and welcome,

I'm a qualified secondary school teacher and taught Religious Education (as well as other subjects ) for a while, though not about Buddhism in detail, because I taught RE in a Catholic School with a fixed syllabus.

There is an education section at the Buddhanet link which follows, where you should be able to find some ideas and resources:........

http://www.buddhanet.net/e-learning/index.htm

and an interactive Wheel of Life here:.......

http://www.buddhanet.net/e-learning/index.htm

I think its worth me mentioning that the 6 realms also represent different mental states which we can experience.

Regarding the question 'how does a Bodhisattva know they are one' - it is my understanding that a true bodhisattva is motivated by the wish to benefit other sentient beings as well as self - and therefore practices Dharma diligently without thought of whether they are actually labelled as 'a bodhisattva' or not.


Kind regards,

Aloka-D.;D

Snowmelt
27 Feb 11, 16:03
Hi. My name is Lizzie

Hi, Lizzie.


and I am teaching Buddhism as part of a religious studies course in England to 16- 18 year olds.

A very honourable activity.


Is this cheeky of me?

Not at all.


My students want to know how a Bodhisattva knows that they are one. I have given them some ideas to answer this on our forum at college but I want them to find out how they can answer their own question...

Can't answer this one knowledgeably, as I follow what is probably best described as the Proto-Buddhist path. I might be more use further down the page. ;D


Other things they have asked about are: when we did the Tibetan wheel of life they want to know why the cockerel represents greed ( and presumably, the snake anger or hatred and the pig ignorance)..where cold they go to find out about this when we have no Buddhists at college to help us?

Ditto.


I know that there are some questions that the Buddha refused to answer, and as a teacher I see myself as a facilitator rather than as someone who has all the answers. I want my students to learn life lessons from my classes and about how they can apply what they learn about Buddhism to their own experience.

The way Buddhism first positively affected my own life was through the learning of new thoughts that would then arise in a given situation instead of my old, unproductive thoughts.


Oh, one more thing. We had to learn about the spread of Buddhism and they learnt about Asoka. It is not very inspiring for people of that age group and I am looking for ideas as to how to make it more interesting for them. Or do they just need to know that not everything you learn has to be inspiring?

As a teenager, I had an insatiable hunger for stories. If Ashoka had been presented to me in story form, I would have devoured him, so to speak. The story of an all-conquering warrior-king who then renounced war would have penetrated right to my heart and have been burned into my memory.

Regards,

Andrew

Element
28 Feb 11, 08:12
Hi Lizzie & welcome

My Vajrayana teacher taught me there are three qualities a practitioner need develop to complete the training of a Bodhisatva:

(1) the first quality is to understand the laws of karma (action & outcome) and to free one's own mind from suffering by realising emptiness (sunyata). In brief, this is mastering the Hinayana path. When the laws of karma of understood, one's mind will be in harmony with the world. The mind will understood both the reasons for problems in the world & the solutions for problems. By freeing one's own mind from suffering, one will be able to guide others in freeing their minds from suffering. If one has not freed their own mind from suffering, it will be difficult to help others free their mind's from suffering. By understanding the laws of karma, one has the knowledge to help others with their everyday lives.

(2) the second quality is called 'bodhicitta', the wish or intention to free all sentient beings from suffering. In brief, this is developing compassion. This is called the Mahayana path. When a Bodhisatva meets another human being, their mind is focused on not harming that person, making that person feel safe and helping them in whatever way they can.

(3) the third quality is to develop the outward qualilties of a beautiful diety or god (angel). In brief, this is the development of paramis or perfections, especially the parami of loving-kindness. This is called the Vajrayana path. A Bodhisatva has perfected themself in loving-kindness when they have the capacity to make each human being they meet feel deeply loved & respected. For example, when people meet the Dalai Lama, they often report they felt the Dalai Lama genuinely loved & respected them as an individual. This loving-kindness includes what the Dalai Lama often calls "warmth".

OK. This is my reply to your question. I hope other members here can offer you a reply.

Warm regards

Nick

;D

Element
28 Feb 11, 08:31
Hi again Lizzie

For the pig, snake & rooster, your students can Google together "snake pig Dependent Origination" an find various explanations, such as here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bhavacakra


The pig stands for ignorance; this comparison is based on the Indian concept of a pig being the most foolish of animals, since it sleeps in the dirtiest places and eats whatever comes to its mouth. The snake represents aversion or anger; this is because it will be aroused and strike at the slightest touch. The bird represents attachment (also translated as desire or clinging). The particular bird used in this diagram represents an Indian bird that is very attached to it's partner.

or a Thai verson, here:http://www.meditationthailand.com/paticcasamuppada.htm

different than the Tibetan, but interesting for discussion


1. A pig is a greedy animal that eats without any consideration and always goes to sleep afterwards. Though he is already full up, hunger is still in his mind. He represents greed which is lobha.

2. A snake is a poisonous animal that bites and kills his enemies with venom. This signifies vindictiveness, so he stands for anger (dosa).

3. A cock is an animal that is full of vanity and likes to show off his beauty. He also thinks that he is virtues in every respect and likes to scratch the earth. This means that he constantly creates impulses and emotions. So he represents delusion which is moha.
Keep in mind, for academic purposes, the Wheel Of Life illustration is Tibetan (and not Thai).

;D

Element
28 Feb 11, 08:49
About King Ashoka, I am not sure what to say. As a Buddhist, I do not know much about him, except his name means "no sorrow". He was a remorseless & brutul warrior, until one day his mind felt deep remorse at his killing, so he became a sincere Buddhist afterwards.

Wikipedia is here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ashoka

An essay by a Theravadin monk is here: http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/dhammika/wheel386.html

;D

podgerl
28 Feb 11, 16:52
Hi Aloka-D.
Many thanks for your warm welcome. Good to hear of your experience as a teacher. I feel as though I am no longer alone! I have used some of Buddhanet and the interactive wheel of life is great. Will check it out again to see what else there is. All this is really useful, particularly your response to the Bodhisattva question. I will pass it on to my students. I am impressed and delighted with how many replies I have had in such a short time. It has been so worth it. I hope to find the time to log on again soon. Best regards, Lizzie.

podgerl
28 Feb 11, 17:10
Hi Andrew,

"Can't answer this one knowledgeably, as I follow what is probably best described as the Proto-Buddhist path. I might be more use further down the page. ;D "

I'm really interested in the things you find out on the way to finding answers! Can you tell me more about the Proto-Buddhist path you are on? How do you define Proto-Buddhist? As you may be able to tell I am new to the teaching of Buddhism. I have been interested in Buddhism for around 5 years, but would not call myself a Buddhist. I am not sure that "becoming a Buddhist" is a particularly relevant idea as it seems to me to belong to a Western thought process that is not considered important in the main countries where Buddhism is practised. Does that make me a Proto-Buddhist?

"The way Buddhism first positively affected my own life was through the learning of new thoughts that would then arise in a given situation instead of my old, unproductive thoughts. "

This is a lovely response and I can relate to that too...

"As a teenager, I had an insatiable hunger for stories. If Ashoka had been presented to me in story form, I would have devoured him, so to speak. The story of an all-conquering warrior-king who then renounced war would have penetrated right to my heart and have been burned into my memory."

As my students would say, I am loving this! This has given me some ideas for next year if I am allowed the privilege of continuing this honourable activity. (we don't always feel honourable)!

Many thanks for your help and encouragement,

Best regards,

Lizzie

podgerl
28 Feb 11, 22:05
Hi Element!
Thanks for this. I am taking some time to reply as I do want to give it consideration, but time is against me! All really useful stuff and it complements info in the students book about the 10 stages of the Bodhisattva path..... Have to go for now but will try to find time to reply to all your kind posts.

Many thanks,

Lizzie

Snowmelt
28 Feb 11, 22:30
Can you tell me more about the Proto-Buddhist path you are on? How do you define Proto-Buddhist?

Simply put, I want to know and follow what the Buddha taught during his lifetime. To me, this means primarily turning to the Pali Canon (excluding the Abidhamma).

Even there, I think it necessary to be selective and use various methods to try to determine what is consistent with what the Buddha himself taught and what has been added by others, including those who have formulated their additions in such a way as to try to make the reader think that the additions were taught by the Buddha when they were not.


I am not sure that "becoming a Buddhist" is a particularly relevant idea as it seems to me to belong to a Western thought process that is not considered important in the main countries where Buddhism is practised.

Perhaps at the end of the day all roads lead to Rome if one is honest and committed. But, I believe you have a good point there; it is wise to approach "Buddhism" with circumspection.


Does that make me a Proto-Buddhist?

The term "proto-buddhist" is only illustrative. Because my approach to Buddhism has evolved and continues to evolve, it is probably better for me not to label it. Labels can be restrictive.

Nice talking to you. I hope you hang around. ;D

podgerl
01 Mar 11, 12:46
Hi Element,

This is a bit long-winded but gives you an idea of the general sort of discussion we have been having:
One of my students put this on our college forum:

“A Bodhisattva is motivated by pure compassion and love. Their goal is to achieve the highest level of being: that of a Buddha. Bodhisattva is a Sanskrit term which translates as: Bodhi [enlightenment] and sattva [being]. And their reason for becoming a Buddha is to help others. The Bodhisattva will undergo any type of suffering to help another sentient being, whether a tiny insect or a huge mammaTo become a Bodhisattva is to be fearless. There is no aversion for those who are hostile and there is no obsessive clinging to those who are closest to us. There is no possessiveness, only love, compassion and discernment into the nature of reality.
In theory any Buddhist can becomea Bodhisattva, they must posses 6 main attributions.1] generosity, 2] ethics, 3] patience, 4] effort, 5] concentration, and 6] wisdom. These are known as the 6 perfections.

When someone first enters the way of the Bodhisattva, they develop Bodhicitta, or, mind of enlightenment. Even as a person strives towards such an exalted goal, they feel as though they are limited by the fact that they, too, are suffering. So that they can be of aid to others, they decide to become Buddhas for a Buddha is capable of unlimited compassion and wisdom. Also, Buddhas are able to relate to all others at whatever level is needed. To those of lesser intelligence, a Buddha will use simpler words; and to those of great intelligence, a Buddha can explain answers in a more exalted language.”

And another student put this:
“I discovered that the word 'Bodhi' refers to awakeness: a person who wants to become awakened is a Buddhist; a person who has practiced the Bodhi is a Bodhisattva; a person who has perfect Bodhi and has become fully enlightened is a Buddha. So first we must become a Buddhist, and then become a Bodhisattva, and lastly a Buddha. Those who have already achieved the accomplishment of the Bodhisattva always work to benefit others.
Apparrantly, the most important basic fundamental necessary to becoming a Bodhisattva is to have the good motives of a Buddhist. To do this, Buddhists try to attain the Ten Bhumi (qualities) of the Bodhisattva.”


My reply to this and other similar posts is this:
“Great responses. I have been looking at Buddhanet to try to find some of the answers. This has given me more questions.Does a Bodhisattva necessarity know that they are one?Do you have to be a Buddhist to be a Bodhisattva? What is the attitude of the Theravada to Bodhisattvas?

Extract from an e-book by K Sri Dhammananda
What Buddhists Believe
http://www.buddhanet.net/pdf_file/whatbelieve.pdf
Who Is A Bodhisattva?
Although Theravada Buddhists respect Bodhisattvas, they do notregard them as being in the position to enlighten or save others before their own enlightenment. Bodhisattvas are, therefore, not
regarded as saviours in a spiritual sense. In order to gain their final
salvation, all beings must follow the method prescribed by the
Buddha and follow the example set by Him. They must also
personally eradicate their mental defilements and develop all the
great virtues: no one can give them salvation.

Theravada Buddhists do not subscribe to the belief that everyone
must strive to become a Buddha in order to gain Nirvana. However,
the word ‘Bodhi’ is used to refer to the qualities of a Buddha, or
Pacceka Buddha and Arahant in expressions such as Samma Sam
Bodhi, Pacceka Bodhi and Savaka Bodhi. In addition, many of the
Buddhas mentioned in the Mahayana school are not historical
Buddhas and are therefore not given much attention by Theravada
Buddhists.

The notion that certain Buddhas and Bodhisattvas are
waiting in Sukhavati (Pure Land) for those who pray to them is a
notion quite foreign to the fundamental Teachings of the Buddha.
Certain Bodhisattvas are said to voluntarily remain in Sukhavati,
without gaining enlightenment themselves, until every living being
is saved. Given the magnitude of the universe and the infinite
number of beings who are enslaved by ignorance and selfish desire,
this is clearly an impossible task, since there can be no end to the
number of beings in the whole universe.

Must a Bodhisattva always be a Buddhist? We may find among
Buddhists some self-sacrificing and ever loving Bodhisattvas.
Sometimes they may not even be aware of their lofty aspiration, but they instinctively work hard to serve others and cultivate their
pristine qualities. Nevertheless, Bodhisattvas are not only found
among Buddhists, but possibly among the other religionists as well.

The Jataka stories, which relate the previous birth stories of the
Buddha, describe the families and forms of existence taken by the
Bodhisattva. Sometimes He was born as an animal. It is hard to
believe that He could have been born in a Buddhist family in each
and every life. But no matter in what form He was born as or what
family he was born into, He invariably strived hard to develop certain
virtues. His aspiration to gain perfection from life to life until His
final birth when He emerged as a Buddha, is the quality which
clearly distinguishes a Bodhisattva from other beings. What is
important here is not the label “Bodhisattva” but the great virtues
common to everybody.

The belief of some people that the Bodhisattvas exist in a
particular world system as some sort of divine beings is not
consistent with the teaching of the Buddha. Bodhisattvas exist in
any part of the world by cultivating the great virtues and precepts
in order to gain enlightenment. They generally do so as human
beings.”

The discussion continues………..! Thank you for your thoughts.I really like the example of the Dalai Lama.
Lizzie

podgerl
01 Mar 11, 13:03
Hi again Element!
I am loving all this. The students can google "snake pig Dependent Origination" an find various explanations, such as here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bhavacakra."
I really like the idea of them doing the research for their own question and seeing what they can find out about other cultural concepts. I am also interested in getting them to "unpack" the definitions for various pali or sanskrit terms such as the term Bodhicitta which you have given a slightly different spin on. I am also a languages teacher and am fascinated by the way things are translated into English and whether or not this is an accurate rendition of the original language. The students also have to give evidence of knowledge of specific "technical terminology" in their exam so I give them old fashioned vocabulary tests to help them learn.

Yes: "The Wheel of life illustration is Tibetan "and therefore part of the Vajrayana tradition which we have looked at in passing but do not have to study in depth until next year. It is great to hear directly from your Vajrayana teacher. As a teacher-learner would also love to have my own teacher of any of the Buddhist traditions and you people are doing a great job!

Greatly appreciated,

Lizzie

Element
02 Mar 11, 09:16
Hi Lizzie

My school is Theravadin.

I wish to say your students have done very well in their research. (Better than me.)

But, in research, they will find so many different opinions.

My view it is best to stick to Mahayana, because the Bodhisatva is important in Mahayana.

However, even within Mahayana there different opinions.

For example, the Mahayana/Vajrayana monk (Geshe) I learned from said the same as K Sri Dhammananda (who is Theravada), that a practitioner cannot be in a position to enlighten or save others before their own enlightenment.

This Mahayana website about Bodhisatvas, http://www.bodhicitta.net/BODHISATTVAVOWS.htm, states downfalls of a Bodhisatva include: (1)misconceiving that bodhisattvas do not attempt to attain liberation and (2) failing to view delusions as things to be eliminated.

Warm regards

;D

Element
02 Mar 11, 09:30
Hi Lizzie

"Words" in Buddhism are many.

In the Theravada scriptures, the word found is "Bodhisatta" (Pali), which the Buddha used to described himself during the time he was searching for enlightenment.

In Pali, the word specifically means the "being devoted to enlightenment" or the "being destined for enlightenment" rather than the being wishing to save all sentient beings with an ultruistic intention.



bodhi satta (1) a "bodhi -- being," i. e. a being destined to attain fullest enlightenment or Buddhaship.

http://dsal.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/philologic/contextualize.pl?p.2.pali.1663156
The impression I have gained is, in Theravada, Bodhisatta refers exclusively to the Buddha himself.

http://i56.tinypic.com/2uz9qc9.jpg

(from http://www.metta.lk/tipitaka/2Sutta-Pitaka/2Majjhima-Nikaya/Majjhima3/123-acchariyabbhutta-e.html)

Of importance, in Theravada, the Bodhisatta is always unenlightened and never enlightened. For example:



Monks, before my self-awakening, when I was still just an unawakened Bodhisatta, the thought occurred to me: 'Why don't I keep dividing my thinking into two sorts?' So I made thinking imbued with sensuality, thinking imbued with ill will & thinking imbued with harmfulness one sort and thinking imbued with renunciation, thinking imbued with non-ill will & thinking imbued with harmlessness another sort.

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.019.than.html

From reading the scriptures, the initial impression gained is Prince Siddharta's original goal was to find Nirvana (Nibbana) for himself:


"I, too, monks, before my Awakening, when I was an unawakened bodhisatta, being subject myself to birth, sought what was likewise subject to birth. Being subject myself to aging... illness... death... sorrow... defilement, I sought [happiness in] what was likewise subject to illness... death... sorrow... defilement. The thought occurred to me, 'Why do I, being subject myself to birth, seek what is likewise subject to birth? Being subject myself to aging... illness... death... sorrow... defilement, why do I seek what is likewise subject to illness... death... sorrow... defilement? What if I, being subject myself to birth, seeing the drawbacks of birth, were to seek the unborn, unexcelled rest from the yoke: Nibbana? What if I, being subject myself to aging... illness... death... sorrow... defilement, seeing the drawbacks of aging... illness... death... sorrow... defilement, were to seek the aging-less, illness-less, deathless, sorrow-less, unexcelled rest from the yoke: Nibbana?'

"So, at a later time, while still young, a black-haired young man endowed with the blessings of youth in the first stage of life — and while my parents, unwilling, were crying with tears streaming down their faces — I shaved off my hair & beard, put on the ochre robe and went forth from the home life into homelessness.

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.026.than.html

However, a later impression gained is at some time during his search for enlightenment, Siddharta, the Bodhisatta, realised his search was for the benefit & happiness of many, out of sympathy for the world.


Before my Awakening, when I was still an unawakened Bodhisatta, the thought occurred to me as well: 'It's not easy to maintain seclusion, not easy to enjoy being alone. The forests, as it were, plunder the mind of a monk who has not attained concentration.'

The thought occurred to me: 'When priests or contemplatives who are drooling idiots, resort to isolated forest or wilderness dwellings, it's the fault of their drooling idiocy that they give rise to unskillful fear & terror. But it's not the case that I am a drooling idiot, when I resort to isolated forest or wilderness dwellings.

If anyone, when speaking rightly, were to say, 'A being not subject to delusion has appeared in the world for the benefit & happiness of many, out of sympathy for the world, for the welfare, benefit & happiness of human & divine beings,' he would rightly be speaking of me.

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.004.than.html

Whilst raising questions about when such suttas were spoken, written or included in the Theravada scriptures, the Nalaka Sutta (http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/kn/snp/snp.3.11.than.html) provides the classic image of the Mahayana style Bodhisatta:


Asita the seer, in his mid-day meditation,
saw the devas (gods) of the Group of Thirty
— exultant, ecstatic —
dressed in pure white, honoring Indra,
holding up banners, cheering wildly,
& on seeing the devas so joyful & happy,
having paid his respects, he said:

"Why is the deva community
so wildly elated?
Why are they holding up banners
& waving them around?
Even after the war with the Asuras
— when victory was the devas'.
the Asuras defeated —
even then there was no excitement like this.
Seeing what marvel
are the devas so joyful?
They shout,
they sing,
play music,
clap their hands,
dance.
So I ask you, who live on Mount Meru's summit.
Please dispel my doubt quickly, dear sirs."

"The Bodhisatta, the foremost jewel,
unequaled,
has been born for welfare & ease
in the human world,
in a town in the Sakyan countryside,
Lumbini.
That's why we're all so wildly elated.
He, the highest of all beings,
the ultimate person,
a bull among men, foremost of all people,
will set turning the Wheel [of Dhamma]
in the grove named after the seers,
like a strong, roaring lion,
the conqueror of beasts."







;D

Element
02 Mar 11, 10:10
Theravada Buddhists do not subscribe to the belief that everyone must strive to become a Buddha in order to gain Nirvana. However, the word ‘Bodhi’ is used to refer to the qualities of a Buddha, or Pacceka Buddha and Arahant in expressions such as Samma Sam Bodhi, Pacceka Bodhi and Savaka Bodhi.
Also, I would be careful here with what K Sri Dhammananda has said because it is bound to create unnecessary confusion.

In Theravada, although the word 'buddha' can be used generically, generally it is used exclusively for the Buddha himself.

There is only one Samma Sam Buddha, which is Gotama. The Samma Sam Buddha is the one who gains enlightenment without a teacher and then starts the Buddhist religion in the world.

In Majjhima Nikaya Sutta 115, the Buddha said there can only be one SammaSamBuddha is a world system (link here: (http://www.dhammasukha.org/Study/Talks/Transcripts/MN-115-SUM03-TS.htm)).

Paccka Buddhas are silent Buddhas, who gain enlightenment without a teacher and do not teach (link here: (http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.116.piya.html))

In Theravada, for other fully enlightened beings, who are disciples of the Buddha, it is best to use the word 'arahant'.

Lesser enlightened beings are called 'stream enterers', 'once-returners' and 'non-returners'.

Each of these four levels of enlightenment has realised how to end suffering although the 'stream enterer' will not have as broad a range of problem solving skills as the 'arahant'.

However, each of these four levels of enlightened beings can be Bodhisatvas in the Mahayana sense because each has the genuine realisation of how to end suffering, which they can share with others.

;D

Element
02 Mar 11, 10:31
Hi Lizzie

If we wish to throw a spanner into the works & do some Theravada sabotage, in the Uttiya Sutta (http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/an/an10/an10.095.than.html), it is reported the Buddha remained silent on the question whether all human beings will be "saved":


And, Master Gotama, when having directly known it, you teach the Dhamma to your disciples for the purification of beings, for the overcoming of sorrow & lamentation, for the disappearance of pain & distress, for the attainment of the right method, & for the realization of Nibbana, will all the world be led [to release], or a half of it, or a third?"

When this was said, the Blessed One was silent.
In the Ariyapariyesana Sutta (http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.026.than.html), it is reported the Buddha made the aspiration after enlightenment to guide those with little dust in their eyes.


Then, having understood Brahma's invitation, out of compassion for beings, I surveyed the world with the eye of an Awakened One. As I did so, I saw beings with little dust in their eyes and those with much, those with keen faculties and those with dull, those with good attributes and those with bad, those easy to teach and those hard, some of them seeing disgrace & danger in the other world.

Just as in a pond of blue or red or white lotuses, some lotuses — born & growing in the water — might flourish while immersed in the water, without rising up from the water; some might stand at an even level with the water; while some might rise up from the water and stand without being smeared by the water — so too, surveying the world with the eye of an Awakened One, I saw beings with little dust in their eyes and those with much, those with keen faculties and those with dull, those with good attributes and those with bad, those easy to teach and those hard, some of them seeing disgrace & danger in the other world.

Open are the doors to the Deathless
to those with ears.
Let them show their conviction.
Perceiving trouble, O Brahma,
I did not tell people
the refined,
sublime Dhamma


;D

frank
08 Mar 11, 12:21
Element,l am so impressed,wow.