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Aloka
01 Oct 14, 20:55
I wasn't sure where to put this and then decided to choose this forum.

Sam Harris talks for just over 6 minutes about the practice of mindfulness and Buddhism.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iwac6Uk-zyk



This is a link below to the first chapter of his new book "Waking Up - A guide to spirituality without religion"

http://www.samharris.org/blog/item/chapter-one


:hands:

Vangelis
01 Oct 14, 23:34
Methinks he does protest too much. He practices Buddhist meditation but he wants to take the Buddhism out of the meditation. Meditation for the sake of meditation has some benefits but to discover the path on ones own is so incredibly difficult that it does not happen "by accident" as he commented. The Buddha deliberately sought the path and deliberately taught the path for the benefit of all beings. Of course Harris would reject the notion that the path leads to complete cessation but then my response would be why waste time meditating at all? We all die whether we meditate or not so what is the point? I'd love to have the discussion with him though because I don't think he has been challenged on this point.

McKmike
08 Nov 14, 14:04
I think if it walks like a duck, looks like a duck and sounds like a duck -- it is a duck!!, Sam Harris quite rightly says that mindfulness meditation quite happily exists with out the religiosity of some forms of Buddhism, true, but he also says that mindfulness meditation is Buddhist, so for me there are two thousand five hundred years of experience of what mindfulness is and where it takes you, by other human beings just like me, so for me there is a treasure trove of knowledge residing in Buddhism, the Buddha him self said " "Come, Kalamas. Do not go upon what has been acquired by repeated hearing; nor upon tradition; nor upon rumor; nor upon what is in a scripture; nor upon surmise; nor upon an axiom; nor upon specious reasoning; nor upon a bias towards a notion that has been pondered over; nor upon another's seeming ability; nor upon the consideration, 'The monk is our teacher.' Kalamas, when you yourselves know: 'These things are good; these things are not blamable; these things are praised by the wise; undertaken and observed, these things lead to benefit and happiness,' enter on and abide in them." ( Kalama sutta http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/soma/wheel008.html)

I think Sam Harris still wears the Abrahamic Religious goggles when looking at Buddhism, which I am sure he can justify with religious examples and practices from all sects of Buddhism, however, if you look at the source material a very different picture emerges, I think

Alexander
10 Nov 14, 21:18
He makes a lot of sense, and what he is doing is great, the Buddha himself walked away from any existing religion to uncover Dhamma, plus I find it great that non Buddhists use these tools, everybody would benefit from them.

At the same time, some of the things he dismisses are true to me, he has his experiences, I got mine, it's all good.

And so, the way he defines Buddhism as sectarian is just his opinion based on dismissing things that are outside his experience. I always try to remember that "having no views is the right view".

Trilaksana
12 Nov 14, 03:18
I more often than not agree with Sam Harris. I read his blog on a regular basis so while I haven't read "Waking Up" I've seen basically everything about it that he's posted on his blog including the first chapter. I generally find myself agreeing with Sam.


he also says that mindfulness meditation is Buddhist, so for me there are two thousand five hundred years of experience of what mindfulness is and where it takes you, by other human beings just like me, so for me there is a treasure trove of knowledge residing in Buddhism

Sam Harris definitely acknowledges that "there is a treasure trove of knowledge residing in Buddhism." All you have to do is look at this list of recommended reading to see that he does in fact hold at the very least certain aspects of Buddhism in high regard.

http://www.samharris.org/book_store/category/eastern-philosophy-and-meditation