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Aloka
24 Feb 14, 06:56
Do you have a sutta in the Pali Canon which is very special to you ? If so, can you tell us which one it is and why?

Esho
24 Feb 14, 22:49
There are several of them but quickly, come to mind Anapanasati Sutta (http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.118.than.html): it is brilliantly explained how to practice mindfulness with breathing in a very simple way.

Sammaditthi Sutta (http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.009.ntbb.html) is a core one; it tells how to develop deep insight exposing with clarity the path.

Assu Sutta (http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/sn/sn15/sn15.003.than.html) -the one about shedding tears- is beautiful. I love it. There we can understand the goal of cultivating a peaceful mind.

But being honest, a core sutta for me is 'Uppajjhatthana Sutta (http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/an/an05/an05.057.than.html)' -Subjects of Contemplation-: it is superb. One can develop wisdom and stillness of mind just with this one.

:hands:

Trilaksana
25 Feb 14, 01:48
The Kalama Sutta is definitely one of my favorites because (as it says on access to insight) it's about "The Buddha's Character of Free Inquiry."

http://http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/soma/wheel008.html

Snowmelt
25 Feb 14, 10:41
Tough question! Difficult to pick out just one, when so many have given such pleasure and inspiration.

I remember the first time I came across the Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta (http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/sn/sn56/sn56.011.than.html) as a moving experience, both because of the content and because of the beauty of the prose ("Vision arose, insight arose, discernment arose, knowledge arose, illumination arose within me with regard to things never heard before ..."). I still love it.

For those racked with guilt, suttas involving Angulimala are comforting.

Marcus Epicurus
25 Feb 14, 21:52
For me it would be the Dhammapada as it is a collection of sayings of the Buddha in verse form and one of the most widely read and best known Buddhist scriptures.

The Buddhist scholar and commentator Buddhaghosa explains that each saying recorded in the collection was made on a different occasion in response to a unique situation that had arisen in the life of the Buddha.

The verses are short, sweet, to the point, and best of all, easy to understand and put into practice.

for those of you wishing to read it, here is a lnk at access to insight
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/kn/dhp/index.html

clw_uk
25 Feb 14, 22:16
I'm going to cheat and name two :P


My first one is Bhaddekaratta Sutta: An Auspicious Day

I choose this one because it reminds me to focus on the present moment and not get caught up in distracting thoughts about the past or future



You shouldn't chase after the past
or place expectations on the future.

What is past is left behind.
The future is as yet unreached.

Whatever quality is present
you clearly see right there, right there.

Not taken in, unshaken,
that's how you develop the heart.


Ardently doing
what should be done today,
for — who knows? — tomorrow death.

There is no bargaining
with Mortality & his mighty horde.

Whoever lives thus ardently,
relentlessly both day & night,

has truly had an auspicious day:
so says the Peaceful Sage.


https://www.google.co.uk/?gws_rd=cr&ei=cBQNU8vWB8LOygOohYGoDw#q=buddha+the+past+is+a+m emory



And Maha-Assapura Sutta: The Greater Discourse at Assapura

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.039.than.html


Because it sets out the whole path, from beginning to end.

Aloka
25 Feb 14, 22:28
My first one is Bhaddekaratta Sutta: An Auspicious Day



That's one of my favourites too !:sunny:

...and another is SN 5.2 Soma Sutta, which is about a nun :





Setting at Savatthi.

Then, in the morning, the bhikkhuni Soma dressed and, taking bowl and robe, entered Savatthi for alms. When she had walked for alms in Savatthi and had returned from her alms round, after her meal she went to the Blind Men's Grove for the day's abiding. Having plunged into the Blind Men's Grove, she sat down at the foot of a tree for the day's abiding.

Then Mara the Evil One, desiring to arouse fear, trepidation, and terror in the bhikkhuni Soma, desiring to make her fall away from concentration, approached her and addressed her in verse:

"That state so hard to achieve
Which is to be attained by the seers,
Can't be attained by a woman
With her two-fingered wisdom."

Then it occurred to the bhikkhuni Soma: "Now who is this that recited the verse — a human being or a non-human being?" Then it occurred to her: "This is Mara the Evil One, who has recited the verse desiring to arouse fear, trepidation, and terror in me, desiring to make me fall away from concentration."

Then the bhikkhuni Soma, having understood, "This is Mara the Evil One," replied to him in verses:

"What does womanhood matter at all
When the mind is concentrated well,
When knowledge flows on steadily
As one sees correctly into Dhamma.

One to whom it might occur,
'I'm a woman' or 'I'm a man'
Or 'I'm anything at all' —
Is fit for Mara to address."

Then Mara the Evil One, realizing, "The bhikkhuni Soma knows me," sad and disappointed, disappeared right there.

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/sn/sn05/sn05.002.bodh.html



:hands:

Esho
26 Feb 14, 00:12
There are several of them but quickly, come to mind Anapanasati Sutta (http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.118.than.html): it is brilliantly explained how to practice mindfulness with breathing in a very simple way.

Sammaditthi Sutta (http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.009.ntbb.html) is a core one; it tells how to develop deep insight exposing with clarity the path.

Assu Sutta (http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/sn/sn15/sn15.003.than.html) -the one about shedding tears- is beautiful. I love it. There we can understand the goal of cultivating a peaceful mind.

But being honest, a core sutta for me is 'Uppajjhatthana Sutta (http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/an/an05/an05.057.than.html)' -Subjects of Contemplation-: it is superb. One can develop wisdom and stillness of mind just with this one.

:hands:

Ups! I forgot the 'Simsapa Sutta' (http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/sn/sn56/sn56.031.wlsh.html). It is one of my favourites, too. This is a great sutta because it remembers us the essence of Buddha's path mostly when we start thinking about the endless topics around buddhism; those that distracts the mind from the important aspects.

;)

seattlegal
08 Mar 14, 20:29
Many of my favorites have already been posted. (Dhammapada, Kalama Sutta, Simpasa Sutta, Setting the Wheel of Dhamma in Motion, Soma Sutta, etc. All are excellent.)

Three other suttas I like: Kayagata-sati Sutta: Mindfulness Immersed in the Body (http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.119.than.html), as practicing it will induce lucid dreaming (if you know that you are walking when you are walking, then you are apt to realize you are not actually walking in a dream, so you will know you are actually dreaming while dreaming. When you know you are dreaming, you can walk through walls, etc. in your dream.) :mrgreen:

It was also quite helpful when I did some insight meditation investigating the nature of PMS several years ago.

Another I like is the Anupada Sutta: One After Another (http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.111.than.html), with its detail about "ferreting out" the different mental states that arise and pass away in the jhanas.

Finally, the Alagaddupama Sutta: Water Snake Simile (http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.022.than.html), which helps to understand the importance of getting a "correct grasp" of Buddha's teachings.

Great thread! :up2:

Sea Turtle
13 Mar 14, 15:12
Thanks for the wonderful thread. I've been enjoying reading through the suttas listed here. At this moment, I can't list any one favorite. But I will say that I recently read Magandiya Sutta: To Magandiya (http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.075x.than.html) and the imagery struck me quite forcefully...quite powerfully.

There's also a beautiful passage within that sutta:

"Then at that moment the Blessed One exclaimed,

Freedom from disease: the foremost good fortune.
Unbinding: the foremost ease.
The eightfold: the foremost of paths
going to the Deathless,
Secure."

Sea Turtle

:hands:

Aloka
22 Sep 15, 21:33
Another one of my favourites to add to the list:





SN 1.10 Arañña Sutta: The Wilderness

translated from the Pali by
John D. Ireland


Thus have I heard. At one time the Lord was staying near Savatthi, at the Jeta Grove in Anathapindika's monastery. Now when night was passing a certain devataa, lighting up the whole Jeta Grove with her surpassing beauty, approached the Lord. Having drawn near and prostrated herself she stood to one side.

Standing there the devata said:

"Those living in the forest,
Peaceful and calm, of pure life,
Eating but one meal a day:
How is it they appear so radiant?"


The Lord replied:

"They sorrow not for what is past,
They have no longing for the future,
The present is sufficient for them:
Hence it is they appear so radiant.

By having longing for the future,
By sorrowing over what is past,
By this fools are withered up
As a cut down tender reed."


http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/sn/sn01/sn01.010.irel.html




:hands:

Neyya
30 Sep 15, 13:30
I like the Khaggavisana Sutta. "The Rhinoceros Sutta" It speaks of being steadfast in our practice.

SimpleLife
03 Oct 15, 03:28
A pivotal sutta for me would be the Kalama sutta as was mentioned before. When I was wandering, wondering what to believe, if anything, I happened across it and said "Yea, I get that"

'Don't go by reports, by legends, by traditions, by scripture, by logical conjecture, by inference, by analogies, by agreement through pondering views, by probability, or by the thought, "This contemplative is our teacher." When you know for yourselves that, "These qualities are unskillful; these qualities are blameworthy; these qualities are criticized by the wise; these qualities, when adopted & carried out, lead to harm & to suffering" — then you should abandon them.'
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/an/an03/an03.065.than.html