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Aloka
28 Jan 14, 18:11
This is by Thich Nhat Hahn. (who I think will be 88 this year)



Hugging Meditation


When we hug, our hearts connect and we know that we are not separate beings. Hugging with mindfulness and concentration can bring reconciliation, healing, understanding, and much happiness. The practice of mindful hugging has helped so many to reconcile with each other- fathers and sons, mothers and daughters, friends and friends, and so many others.

We may practice hugging meditation with a friend, our daughter, our father, our partner or even with a tree. To practice, we first bow and recognize the presence of each other. Then we can enjoy three deep conscious breaths to bring ourselves fully there. We then may open your arms and begin hugging. Holding each other for three in-and-out breaths. With the first breath, we are aware that we are present in this very moment and we are happy. With the second breath, we are aware that the other is present in this moment and we are happy as well. With the third breath, we are aware that we are here together, right now on this earth, and we feel deep gratitude and happiness for our togetherness. We then may release the other person and bow to each other to show our thanks.

When we hug in such a way, the other person becomes real and alive. We do not need to wait until one of us is ready to depart for a trip, we may hug right now and receive the warmth and stability of our friend in the present moment. Hugging can be a deep practice of reconciliation. During the silent hugging, the message can come out very clear: “Darling, you are precious to me. I am sorry I have not been mindful and considerate. I have made mistakes. Allow me to begin anew. I Promise.”

http://plumvillage.org/mindfulness-practice/hugging-meditation/




Any comments ?

fletcher
28 Jan 14, 19:58
This actually put me off from joining a community of interbeing sangha as mindful hugging was listed as part of the agenda of their mindful days. It probably sounds very shallow, but could you imagine returning home from a sangha meeting and telling my lovely non Buddhist wife I'd spent the last couple of hours hugging virtual strangers. She is very supportive of my practice but couldn't imagine she'd be too happy about it and I wouldn't be comfortable with it either.

jonno
30 Jan 14, 10:01
Hi all, in my interbeing sangha we all greet each other with a hug. Doesn't matter if it is a man or woman it is a gesture of love and acceptance. It doesn't cause embarrassment or a uncomfortable feeling, in fact it brings us closer. Also when you do a hugging meditation you are expressing love for all beings. So give yourself a hug. Love Jonno...
.

Empty Bowl
16 Feb 14, 04:27
I would have a really hard time with this because of years spent (uselessly) in so-called 'charismatic' churches where everyone was huggy-feely at services. "Hug the person on your right and tell them how much you really love them in the name of jesus..." Always struck me as mechanical and unreal because the people there never seemed much interested in me as a person, just going through the motions. It served to close my shell up.

To this day expressing emotion has been extremely difficult, and my preference is still to live alone and be in permanent retreat, managing contacts at work but not much else outside of it. Forget the concepts of a blind date with someone!

John Marder
17 Feb 14, 23:19
Sometimes Snoops sits close to me when I'm chanting or meditating and I lay my hand on his head for a few seconds. For me personally, that's about as tactile as I would ever want to be at those times.:lol:

Aloka
05 Apr 14, 08:08
I don't even greet close friends with a hug, unless I haven't seen them for a long time, or if they're going away somewhere.

Maybe a light kiss on the cheek, if its someone I know really well.


To practice, we first bow and recognize the presence of each other. Then we can enjoy three deep conscious breaths to bring ourselves fully there. We then may open your arms and begin hugging.




in my interbeing sangha we all greet each other with a hug. Doesn't matter if it is a man or woman it is a gesture of love and acceptance. It doesn't cause embarrassment or a uncomfortable feeling, in fact it brings us closer. Also when you do a hugging meditation you are expressing love for all beings.

Being expected to hug everyone when meeting up with a group, isn't for me.

I don't feel its necessary to get touchy-feely with others in order to be able to practice meditation, listen to the Buddha's teachings, or to be kind.

;D

jonno
05 Apr 14, 17:18
I don't even greet close friends with a hug, unless I haven't seen them for a long time, or if they're going away somewhere.

Maybe a light kiss on the cheek, if its someone I know really well.





Being expected to hug everyone when meeting up with a group, isn't for me.

I don't feel its necessary to get touchy-feely with others in order to be able to practice meditation, listen to the Buddha's teachings, or to be kind .

;D

jonno
05 Apr 14, 17:26
Hi. First of all when you do hugging meditation you breathe together 3 times then disengage. It is NOT meant to be a greeting but a sharing of the dharma and A shared breathing meditation.

No one is EXPECTED to hug everyone, it is a personal choice, and of course we listen to the Buddhas teachings. Of course we practice meditation, and of course we practice love and compassion to all beings. Hope that is of use . Love and hugs . Jonno

Aloka
05 Apr 14, 17:39
Hi. First of all when you do hugging meditation you breathe together 3 times then disengage. It is NOT meant to be a greeting but a sharing of the dharma and A shared breathing meditation.

No one is EXPECTED to hug everyone, it is a personal choice, and of course we listen to the Buddhas teachings. Of course we practice meditation, and of course we practice love and compassion to all beings. Hope that is of use . Love and hugs . Jonno

Hi Jonno,

When someone writes in capital letters in forum posts, it reminds me of shouting - and you said in post #3:



in my interbeing sangha we all greet each other with a hug

and then in post#8:


It is NOT meant to be a greeting

Kind regards,

Aloka ;D

woodscooter
05 Apr 14, 19:40
Interesting to see the range of views expressed over hugging.

Although I don't normally get on well with touchy-feely behaviour, or greeting with kisses on the cheek (I never know if it should be once, twice or three times, various people have different expectations), yet where a hug is offered or expected I have no problem with a hug. It is, or can be, a most warm physical greeting and it works equally for men and women in all combinations.

I've never tried 'hugging meditation'. I don't see it as having any connection with Buddhism. Thich Nhat Hahn can introduce it as he pleases to the communities he leads, and it can be a tool for helping people feel they belong there. That's as far as it goes, to my way of looking at it.

jonno
05 Apr 14, 21:36
Hi all. Aloka. Please try to see the difference between shouting and emphasis , two entirely different things.Hugging meditation is a total connection with Buddhism. ie. two people and therefore all beings
Conjoining and meeting as one in the spirit of love and compassion. Love Jonno

Aloka
06 Apr 14, 02:43
Hugging meditation is a total connection with Buddhism. ie. two people and therefore all beings Conjoining and meeting as one in the spirit of love and compassion.


I'm sorry but those comments don't make much sense to me at all, jonno, so I'll just leave it at that, thanks.

:peace:

Otter
07 Apr 14, 05:57
I'd be a bit uncomfortable with it, especially the part about breathing three breaths with that person. I don't mind hugging friends or family, but for three breaths
it would feel really awkward. I go to a traditional Lao temple, and some people sort of freak out if you put your hand on their shoulder for support.

I'd also sort of see it as a distraction, and an unnecessary sensual experience. That's just my two cents

Sea Turtle
07 Apr 14, 17:51
I'd also sort of see it as a distraction, and an unnecessary sensual experience.

I'd been thinking about how to express my feelings about this topic, and find that Otter has articulated it perfectly for me.

Sea Turtle
:hands:

RoseDancer
10 Apr 14, 19:09
I would have a problem hugging strangers. I go to a very personal and intimate space when I’m about to meditate.
I don’t think I would be too comfortable letting strangers get that close.