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Jessie797
03 Jan 14, 06:17
Buddhism cherishes believers' practicing its doctrines in daily lives once they've really understood them. But what are the most fundamental principles we should obey when we practice them? Here is one of the stories about the primary rules:

Long time ago, we were told a story by an old monk: One day a young monk encountered a Buddhas built up outdoor. The sunlight was scorching and fierce. He felt very ashamed and distressed for the Buddhas’ suffering. “How can I leave him exposed to the dazzling sunshine without any shelter?” he said to himself. In the meantime, he got nothing but a pair of straw sandals to spare.
“Well, I have only these shoes to be dedicated to the Buddhas then.” said he, placing the shoes on the top of the Buddhas’ head to screen him from the sunlight. And then he left on bare feet.
After the first monk leaving, another monk passed by the Buddhas. Seeing a pair of straw sandals on the top of the Buddhas, he cried out: “Who committed such a heavy offence!” He removed the sandals off the Buddhas and wiped the head very clean.
These two monks are both very kind and respectful to the Buddhas. Why? Since their motives are pure and good. Therefore, if doing things out of true and sincere heart, there would be no fault in our deeds when practicing Buddhism doctrines in our daily lives.

This story is translated from the Pure Land Buddhism Talks of the honored Ven. Master Chin Kung,the founder of the Pure Land Learning College Association, Inc.

The talk's link....http://www.purelandcollege.org.au/

Aloka
03 Jan 14, 10:25
One day a young monk encountered a Buddhas built up outdoor. The sunlight was scorching and fierce. He felt very ashamed and distressed for the Buddhas’ suffering. “How can I leave him exposed to the dazzling sunshine without any shelter?

Hi Jesse,

Please explain how statues can suffer.


These two monks are both very kind and respectful to the Buddhas. Why? Since their motives are pure and good. Therefore, if doing things out of true and sincere heart, there would be no fault in our deeds when practicing Buddhism doctrines in our daily lives.


Please explain how caring about statues means that someone has a pure heart , or relates to practising the Dharma in everyday life.

I like cats , so lets suppose I have a statue of a cat in my garden. I regularly keep it clean, plant flowers around it, chat to it occasionally, and put an umbrella over it when it rains - does that mean that there will be "no fault" in my deeds "when practising Buddhist doctrines"?

Kind regards,

Aloka ;D

Jessie797
03 Jan 14, 11:46
Dear Aloka,

Thanks for your question! As religion believers, we all have statues or portraits of the gods to worship. In Buddhism, Buddha is much more like a teacher or a precursor of our lives than the god of this religion. He can not protect us or bless us for our good fortune, but he told us through the Sutra what should be done and what can't if we pray for good luck. Consecrating the Buddhas at home or in the temples is to remind us of all these rules and principles every minute of every day. Instead of just keeping them in mind, Buddha requires us to put them into practice in our daily life.

Of course, the Buddhas we are worshiping are the symbol of Buddha. Therefore we show respects to Buddha through worshiping the Buddhas,just like the way the Christians behave to the cross and the Jesus statue.

I wonder if I have made it clear. Anyway, please don't hesitate to ask me if you have any other questions.

Yours
Jessie

Aloka
03 Jan 14, 12:27
Of course, the Buddhas we are worshiping are the symbol of Buddha. Therefore we show respects to Buddha through worshiping the Buddhas,just like the way the Christians behave to the cross and the Jesus statue.



Hi Jesse,

Personally I don't worship "Buddhas" or the historical Buddha.

My statue of the Buddha is a reminder of the (historical) Buddha's teachings and "the triple gem" of Buddha, Dharma and Sangha. (as are statues of the Buddha I see at centres, temples and monasteries)

However, it's my opinion that if I start regarding a statue as an actual person 'suffering' from heat and lack of shelter, then I'm venturing into a fanciful realm of superstition.

The Buddha was enlightened, which means he was free from suffering.

Kind regards,

Aloka:hands:

Jessie797
03 Jan 14, 12:39
Yes, I agree with your "The Buddha was free from suffering". However, most fresh and ordinary worshipers haven't reach such depth like you. They tend to treat and respect the Buddha as a human being like them.

Interestingly, Buddha had been just an ordinary man like us before he proved the truth of the universe and became Buddha. That is also our orbit to success, isn't it.

John Marder
04 Jan 14, 01:11
May be the monk who put the sandals on the head had a bit more of a sense of humour than the other one. I don't know. But it's interesting how we view 'Buddha' in different ways; as an object of worship, as a special person from whom we can learn. Clearly it can be both those things but surely most importantly it is a quality within our lives that we must strive through our practice to realise and help others do the same.Thanks for the story Jessie, it made me smile and I kind of feel that bare footed monk might have been smiling too

Jessie797
04 Jan 14, 04:10
Hi, Marder,

It's my pleasure to share the story with all of you! And it is indeed the case that we view 'Buddha' in different ways as we choose. After all it will make sense if these different views could really help every single one of us. Like you said that doing things and treating others out of purity and sincerity is a quality within our lives that we must strive through our practice to realize.

I am really very glad this story made you happy, dear Marder.

Best regards
Jessie

benthejack
21 Feb 14, 13:04
Hey Jesse, thanks for the story.
It really comes down to intention doesn't it, my favorite story is one of two monks who are about to have a debate and One monk to test the others wisdom stands in the doorway with one foot inside the door and One foot outside and asks the other "am I coming in the room or am I going out" the second monks looks at him and replies "well that depends on your intention, if you intend on coming in you'll come in, and if you intend on going out you'll do just that."

It seems to be the same idea in a different story.
If one has a pure intention his actions will necessarily be pure :)

Maintop
22 Feb 14, 21:13
Hi Jessie

I have a little statue of the Buddha next to my bed. I certainly dont think of it as any more than just that - a statue. But every time I look at it, it makes me think what a wonderful person he was and how I must strive to follow his teachings. I try to keep it clean and free from other objects but this is only for respect of the person the statue represents.

With metta

Robert

Little Steps
06 Sep 14, 07:40
You have it backwards. FIRST comes the understanding, and THEN comes following the guidelines.
Your understanding comes from your meditation practice. Therefore, meditation is the fundamental practice, that all other practices arise from. Meditation properly done.

If you want to practice Buddhism, find a qualified teacher to take instruction from. Even with Theravadan Buddhism (which is the only tradition that does NOT require a live teacher), you will progress MUCH faster if you have a live teacher.