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Aloka
13 Mar 10, 11:52
.

Any comments or personal reflections connected with this sutta and

the eight worldly conditions? Do you find yourself getting caught up with them?



AN 8.6 - Lokavipatti Sutta: The Failings of the World



"Monks, these eight worldly conditions spin after the world, and the world spins after these eight worldly conditions. Which eight? Gain, loss, status, disgrace, censure, praise, pleasure, & pain. These are the eight worldly conditions that spin after the world, and the world spins after these eight worldly conditions.

"For an uninstructed run-of-the-mill person there arise gain, loss, status, disgrace, censure, praise, pleasure, & pain. For a well-instructed disciple of the noble ones there also arise gain, loss, status, disgrace, censure, praise, pleasure, & pain. So what difference, what distinction, what distinguishing factor is there between the well-instructed disciple of the noble ones and the uninstructed run-of-the-mill person?"

"For us, lord, the teachings have the Blessed One as their root, their guide, & their arbitrator. It would be good if the Blessed One himself would explicate the meaning of this statement. Having heard it from the Blessed One, the monks will remember it."

"In that case, monks, listen & pay close attention. I will speak."

"As you say, lord," the monks responded.

The Blessed One said, "Gain arises for an uninstructed run-of-the-mill person. He does not reflect, 'Gain has arisen for me. It is inconstant, stressful, & subject to change.' He does not discern it as it actually is.

"Loss arises... Status arises... Disgrace arises... Censure arises... Praise arises... Pleasure arises...

"Pain arises. He does not reflect, 'Pain has arisen for me. It is inconstant, stressful, & subject to change.' He does not discern it as it actually is.

"His mind remains consumed with the gain. His mind remains consumed with the loss... with the status... the disgrace... the censure... the praise... the pleasure. His mind remains consumed with the pain.
continued here : URL (http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/an/an08/an08.006.than.html)

plwk
13 Mar 10, 14:32
Thanks for the timely reminder...
It has reminded me what exactly have I been accomplishing thus far on and off the cushion...so much more to be done...so much..
Currently working on disgrace and censure...

Aloka
14 Mar 10, 03:06
I sincerely hope that all will be resolved happily for you. http://www.buddhismwithoutboundaries.com/images/smilies/hands.gif

sukitlek
14 Mar 10, 04:38
The advantage point of this sutta is :-

If the 8 worldly conditions arise to us, just reflect and discern it as it actually is.
If we do a right reflect and discern, the result is the mind does not remain consumed with 8 worldly conditions.

http://www.buddhismwithoutboundaries.com/images/smilies/hands.gif

andyrobyn
14 Mar 10, 06:25
This does encapsulate the conditions we experience - today in the world I live in - still, as it is recorded that it did when Lord Buddha spoke - gain, loss, status, disgrace, censure, praise, pleasure, & pain .... all still can arise, are inconstant, stressful and subject to change http://www.buddhismwithoutboundaries.com/images/smilies/hands.gif

Element
14 Dec 12, 22:58
:hands:

Aloka
18 Dec 12, 23:20
The sutta ends as follows :



Gain/loss,
status/disgrace,
censure/praise,
pleasure/pain:
these conditions among human beings
are inconstant,
impermanent,
subject to change.

Knowing this, the wise person, mindful,
ponders these changing conditions.
Desirable things don't charm the mind,
undesirable ones bring no resistance.

His welcoming
& rebelling are scattered,
gone to their end,
do not exist.
Knowing the dustless, sorrowless state,
he discerns rightly,
has gone, beyond becoming,
to the Further Shore.




Wise words to remember :hands:

padma
06 Jan 13, 13:25
Thank you Aloka. This verse is very beautiful


The sutta ends as follows :



Wise words to remember :hands:

Juniper
12 Jan 13, 03:38
Beautiful sutta Aloka!

My understanding is that all worldly things are transient, impermanent. When such conditions arise it is best not to bask in the pleasurable nor is it good to wallow in the unpleasant. Pleasure, pain, keep an even keel ----- practice equanimity. BTW, does sutta mean thread which is the yogic meaning (sanskrit, I think) only spelled differently --- sutra

Aloka
12 Jan 13, 08:22
BTW, does sutta mean thread which is the yogic meaning (sanskrit, I think) only spelled differently --- sutra

Hi Juniper,

'Sutta' is a Pali word used in Theravada Buddhism and usually refers to a text which is one of the earliest recorded discourses of the historical Buddha or his monks and nuns.

'Sutra' is a Sanskrit word used in Mahayana and can refer to the early Pali suttas but more often refers to Mahayana texts composed by other people at a later time.

with kind wishes

Aloka :hands:

Juniper
12 Jan 13, 22:50
Thank you Aloka. You have clarified the meaning of "sutta" for me. I was not sure if it meant the same as the sanskrit term "sutra" as I am familiar with sanskrit words and not Pali words.:hands:

With Kind Wishes,
Juniper