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Aloka
11 Jun 10, 10:44
Do you ever contemplate the Four Sublime States (Brahma -viharas) ? What do you think might be an effective means of integrating them into everyday life?


http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/nyanaponika/wheel006.html

http://www.buddhismwithoutboundaries.com/images/smilies/hands.gif

sukitlek
12 Jun 10, 02:50
If we can integrate them, we will live with happiness. (Don't forget equanimity)

http://www.buddhismwithoutboundaries.com/images/smilies/hands.gif

winnie
16 Jun 10, 08:25
from post #2

Yes sukitlek, equanimity is the word to remember and practise.

Thanks!

turnerthemanc
18 Jun 10, 00:00
Equanimity is a hard concept to understand. The moment, the suchness, the thusness of life. Its important to understand what we learn by understanding what equanimity is. It happens naturally during a car crash, or the first big drop on a rollercoaster. Its the forcing out of thoughts and volition to experience what not having them 2 things feels like. You dont have to crash the car or go to a funpark to eperience it though.
So what is it
Well my personal experience is a bit like the wizzard of oz. Once Dorathy realised it was a little man behind a puppet, she wasnt scared. Once you get equanimity, you see other things like thoughts and volition as a by-product of 60 or so seperate areas of the brain orchestrating an ego. Liking, disliking. Hating-loving, laughing-crying.

Imagine you have an embarressing Dad. In the resteraunt you see people looking up, and grimacing at his behaviour. You know him of old for 40 years or so. its just your Dad. Likewise, its just your ego. Its just your thoughts. Dont rise to it. Just do what happens.

The beauty of it is that no one need see your thought, unlike your embarrasing dad.

Im just gonna do it. Not think about it.

Aloka
24 Jun 10, 08:54
Equanimity is a hard concept to understand

I've always thought of equanimity as been a mental state of complete calmness and clarity whatever the exterior circumstances.

Equanimity is mentioned by the Buddha here ( its also mentioned at the link #1):



SN 36.31 Niramisa Sutta: Unworldly


"There is, O monks, worldly joy, there is unworldly joy, and there is a still greater unworldly joy. There is worldly happiness, there is unworldly happiness, and there is a still greater unworldly happiness. There is worldly equanimity, there is unworldly equanimity, and there a still greater unworldly equanimity. There is worldly freedom, there is unworldly freedom, and there is a still greater unworldly freedom.

"Now, O monks, what is worldly joy? There are these five cords of sense desire: forms cognizable by the eye that are wished for and desired, agreeable and endearing, associated with sense-desire and tempting to lust. Sounds cognizable by the ear... odors cognizable by the nose... flavors cognizable by the tongue... tangibles cognizable by the body, wished for and desired, agreeable and endearing, associated with sense-desire and tempting to lust. It is the joy that arises dependent on these five cords of sense desire which is called 'worldly joy.'

"Now what is unworldly joy? Quite secluded from sense desires, secluded from unwholesome states of mind, a monk enters upon and abides in the first meditative absorption, which is accompanied by thought-conception and discursive thinking, and has joy and happiness born of seclusion. With the stilling of thought-conception and discursive thinking, he enters upon and abides in the second meditative absorption which has internal confidence and singleness of mind without thought conception and discursive thinking, and has joy and happiness born of concentration. This is called 'unworldly joy.'

"And what is the still greater unworldly joy? When a taint-free monk looks upon his mind that is freed of greed, freed of hatred, freed of delusion, then there arises joy. This called a 'still greater unworldly joy.'

"Now, O monks, what is worldly happiness? There are these five cords of sense desire: forms cognizable by the eye... sounds cognizable by the ear... odors cognizable by the nose... flavors cognizable by the tongue... tangibles cognizable by the body that are wished for and desired, agreeable and endearing, associated with sense desire and alluring. It is the happiness and gladness that arises dependent on these five cords of sense desire which are called 'worldly happiness.'

"Now what is unworldly happiness? Quite secluded from sense desires, secluded from unwholesome states of mind, a monk enters upon and abides in the first meditative absorption... With the stilling of thought-conception and discursive thinking, he enters upon and abides in the second meditative absorption... With the fading away of joy as well, he dwells in equanimity, mindfully and fully aware he feels happiness within, and enters upon and abides in the third meditative absorption of which the Noble Ones announce: 'He dwells in happiness who has equanimity and is mindful.' This is called 'unworldly happiness.'

"And what is the still greater unworldly happiness? When a taint-free monk looks upon his mind that is freed of greed, freed of hatred, freed of delusion, then there arises happiness. This is called a 'still greater unworldly happiness.'

"Now, O monks, what is worldly equanimity? There are these five cords of sensual desire: forms cognizable by the eye... tangibles cognizable by the body that are wished for and desired, agreeable and endearing, associated with sense desire and alluring. It is the equanimity that arises with regard to these five cords of sense desire which is called 'worldly equanimity.'

"Now, what is unworldy equanimity? With the abandoning of pleasure and pain, and with the previous disappearance of gladness and sadness, a monk enters upon and abides in the fourth meditative absorption, which has neither pain-nor-pleasure and has purity of mindfulness due to equanimity. This is called 'unworldly equanimity.'

"And what is the still greater unworldly equanimity? When a taint-free monk looks upon his mind that is freed of greed, freed of hatred and freed of delusion, then there arises equanimity. This is called a 'still greater unworldly equanimity.'

"Now, O monks, what is worldly freedom? The freedom connected with the material. What is unworldly freedom? The freedom connected with the immaterial. And what is the still greater unworldly freedom? When a taint-free monk looks upon his mind that is freed of greed, freed of hatred, and freed of delusion, then there arises freedom."



http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/sn/sn36/sn36.031.nypo.html