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Element
16 Oct 11, 21:32
The following Pali verses use the word "kaya" for "body" or "physical":


And how does a monk remain focused on the body in & of itself?

In this body there are head hairs, body hairs, nails, teeth, skin, flesh, tendons, bones, bone marrow, kidneys, heart, liver, pleura, spleen, lungs, large intestines, small intestines, gorge, feces, bile, phlegm, pus, blood, sweat, fat, tears, skin-oil, saliva, mucus, fluid in the joints, urine.

Satipatthana Sutta


In-&-out breaths are bodily; these are things tied up with the body. That's why in-&-out breaths are bodily fabricators.

Culavedalla Sutta


There is the case where a monk, having gone to the wilderness, to the shade of a tree, or to an empty building, sits down folding his legs crosswise, holding his body erect, and setting mindfulness to the fore

He trains himself, 'I will breathe in calming bodily fabricator.' He trains himself, 'I will breathe out calming bodily fabricator

I tell you, monks, that this — the in-&-out breath — is classed as a body among bodies....

Anapanasati Sutta


Furthermore, quite withdrawn from sensuality, withdrawn from unskillful mental qualities, he enters & remains in the first jhana: rapture & pleasure born from withdrawal, accompanied by directed thought & evaluation. He permeates & pervades, suffuses & fills this very body with the rapture & pleasure born from withdrawal.

Kayagata-sati Sutta


With the fading of rapture I remained in equanimity, mindful & alert and physically sensitive of pleasure. I entered & remained in the third jhana

Bhaya-bherava Sutta


He discerns that 'Whatever disturbances that would exist based on the effluent of sensuality... the effluent of becoming... the effluent of ignorance, are not present. And there is only this modicum of disturbance: that connected with the six sensory spheres, dependent on this very body with life as its condition.'

Cula-suññata Sutta


Yet it is just within this fathom-long body, with its perception & intellect, that I declare that there is the world, the origination of the world, the cessation of the world and the path of practice leading to the cessation of the world.

Rohitassa Sutta


For him — infatuated, attached, confused, not remaining focused on their drawbacks — the five clinging-aggregates head toward future accumulation. The craving that makes for further becoming — accompanied by passion & delight, relishing now this & now that — grows within him. His bodily disturbances & mental disturbances grow. His bodily torments & mental torments grow. His bodily distresses & mental distresses grow. He is sensitive both to bodily stress & mental stress.

Maha-salayatanika Sutta


Just as an oil lamp burns in dependence on oil & wick; and from the termination of the oil & wick — and from not being provided any other sustenance — it goes out unnourished; in the same way, when sensing a feeling limited to the body, he discerns that 'I am sensing a feeling limited to the body.' When sensing a feeling limited to life, he discerns that 'I am sensing a feeling limited to life.' He discerns that 'With the break-up of the body, after the termination of life, everything that is sensed, not being relished, will grow cold right here.

Dipa Sutta


...it can be expected that, shunning these three skillful activities — good bodily conduct, good verbal conduct, good mental conduct — they will adopt & practice these three unskillful activities: bad bodily conduct, bad verbal conduct, bad mental conduct. Why is that? Because those venerable brahmans & contemplatives do not see, in unskillful activities, the drawbacks, the degradation, and the defilement; nor in skillful activities the rewards of renunciation, resembling cleansing.

Apannaka Sutta

:neutral:

Element
16 Oct 11, 21:34
The following Pali verses use the word "rupa" for "body" or "form" or "materiality":


Now what, monks, are the five aggregates?

Whatever form is past, future, or present; internal or external; blatant or subtle; common or sublime; far or near: That is called the form aggregate.

Whatever feeling is past, future, or present; internal or external; blatant or subtle; common or sublime; far or near: That is called the feeling aggregate.

Whatever perception is past, future, or present; internal or external; blatant or subtle; common or sublime; far or near: That is called the perception aggregate.

Whatever (mental) fabrications are past, future, or present; internal or external; blatant or subtle; common or sublime; far or near: Those are called the fabrications aggregate.

Whatever consciousness is past, future, or present; internal or external; blatant or subtle; common or sublime; far or near: That is called the consciousness aggregate.

These are called the five aggregates.

Khandha Sutta


And why do you call it 'form'? Because it is afflicted, thus it is called 'form.' Afflicted with what? With cold & heat & hunger & thirst, with the touch of flies, mosquitoes, wind, sun & reptiles. Because it is afflicted, it is called form.

Khajjaniya Sutta


And what is name-&-form? Feeling, perception, intention, contact, & attention: This is called name. The four great elements, and the form dependent on the four great elements: This is called form. This name & this form are called name-&-form.

Paticca-samuppada-vibhanga Sutta


And what is mentality-materiality? Feeling, perception, volition, contact and attention — these are called mentality. The four great elements and the material form derived from the four great elements — these are called materiality.

Sammaditthi Sutta


And what is becoming? These three are becomings: sensual becoming, form becoming & formless becoming. This is called becoming

Paticca-samuppada-vibhanga Sutta


'The six external media should be known.' Thus was it said. In reference to what was it said? The form-medium, the sound-medium, the aroma-medium, the flavor-medium, the tactile sensation-medium, the mind object-medium

Chachakka Sutta

:neutral:

FBM
17 Oct 11, 01:26
Hmm. http://www.dhammawiki.com/index.php?title=Rupa-kaya

Not sure that's very helpul, tho.

http://books.google.co.kr/books?id=uUveqp7lAVoC&pg=PA26&lpg=PA26&dq=rupa+kaya&source=bl&ots=yE5XKda8kr&sig=FxPbjaWc7YbnFTZmEgJuO22AtgQ&hl=en&ei=uoObTr2PMu7wmAX08N2NAg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=6&ved=0CD4Q6AEwBQ#v=onepage&q=rupa%20kaya&f=false